A bunch of fives

 

Nature boy’s delight

tiny starfish hunker down

in rock pool fissures

 

by Scooj

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Thursday doors – 29 August

Doors 82 – Lanhydrock House (2)

Following on from last week’s trip to Lanhydrock House in Cornwall, this time I’ll share with you some of doors from the inside of this magnificent building.

The house dates back to the 17th century, but much of it caught fire in 1881 and following repairs at that time most of the interior furnishings including the doors are Victorian.

Hall doors with etched windows, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Entrance hall doors with etched windows, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

In true aristocratic Victorian style, there are a lot of dead (stuffed) animals in the house – trophies from colonialhunting trips.

Doors and trophy, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Doors and trophy, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

Food was a big deal in this house and the meals prepared in the kitchens were kept warm in this cabinet before being served in the dining room .

This cast iron cabinet kept the food warm between the kitchens and dining room, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
This cast iron cabinet kept the food warm between the kitchens and dining room, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

We had a kitchen towel like this when I was growing up.

One of several kitchen doors, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
One of several kitchen doors, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
The bread oven, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
The bread oven, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Dairy door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Dairy door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Upstairs door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Upstairs door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Canes - a time gone by thank goodness, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Canes – a time gone by thank goodness, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

Hmmm – there were several of these cane ‘trophies’ hanging in this room, along with plenty of dead animals – the Empire built on a bloody good caning in the headmaster’s office

Coridoor door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Coridoor door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Screen-separated drawing room, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Screen-separated drawing room, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

The drawing room was an altogether beautiful room which was broken down into sections with screens, but was actually vast.

The long gallery, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
The long gallery, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

Finally the tour of the house takes you to the stunning long gallery with its 17th century ceiling. This wing of the house was the only one that survived the fire of 1881.

So that wraps it up for another week or so. Enjoy what’s left of the week and have a lovely weekend.

Please go take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

Scooj

 

 

 

Thursday doors – 22 August

Doors 81 – Lanhydrock House (1)

Last weekend I was lucky enough to visit a National Trust property in Cornwall, south of Bodmin Moor, called Lanhydrock House. Built out of hard wearing granite, the older parts of the house date back to the 1620s, but after a fire in 1881 that started in the kitchens, two of the three wings were in part destroyed and they were rebuilt and funished in the Victorial style. The remaining wing that survived the fire retains its original walls and ceilings.

The house has been owned and managed by the National Trust since 1953, before it was owned by the Robartes family which declined significantly during the first world war. The heir, Thomas Agar-Robartes MP was killed during the battle of Loos in France while trying to rescue a soldier from no-man’s land.

There were an awful lot of doors to admire in this house, so this week I will tease you by only posting the outside doors, the rest will follow in another post.

The visit begins with a stroll through the original gatehouse dating back to the mid 17th century. Did you ever see such a grand entrance?

Lanhydrock House barbican gate added in the 1640s, Cornwall, August 2019
Lanhydrock House barbican gate added in the 1640s, Cornwall, August 2019

Then off to the left are some of the outbuildings such as the coach house. The National Trust use some of these buildings for a cafe and gift shop.

Front of door to courtyard, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Front of door to courtyard, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Same door from the other side, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Same door from the other side, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

The coach house, with stunning deep red doors, is notable for the clock and little doors below it.

Coach house doors, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Coach house doors, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

It would be wrong of me not to include this most attractive door within a door.

Perfect door within a door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Perfect door within a door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

Then to the main house itself, which had more gorgeous doors on its outside walls than I have hairs on my head (I exaggerate slightly).

One of many entrances to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
One of many entrances to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Small door to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Small door to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Larger door to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Larger door to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

The front door is probably the crowning glory of these ‘garden doors’ and dates back to the 1620s. The family crest is on the top right, and the NT lady at the door told us that the crest at the top of the door has no relation to the house or family whatsoever and nobody quite knows what it is doing there.

Main front door to the house dating back to the 17th century, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Main front door to the house dating back to the 17th century, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

So there we are. More Lanhydrock doors next time.

Please go take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

Have a great end of week and weekend.

Scooj