1604. Dean Lane skate park (144)

The unmistakable seismic tag of Jee See. This is just a quick one in Dean Lane skate park. I am interested in this tag, because he uses different 3d skadows for divverent letters, so the SEI shadow downwards, the SMI shadow to the right and the C shadows upwards, which makes for an interesting perspective. Helpful to me to in learning how to work these shadows.

Jee See, Dean Lane, Bristol, July 2018
Jee See, Dean Lane, Bristol, July 2018

I understand the Jee See used to be a teacher, so there is really nothing to stop me picking up a can and getting busy. I get inspiration from artists like Jee See who find spots around the city and practice their work.

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1594. Dean Lane skate park (143)

On my way home from my spray art lesson in the Upfest shop garden with Loch Ness, I made a quick diversion into Dean Lane because not to do so would be negligent. There were one or two new pieces, but best of all was bumping into Slim Pickings as he was finishing off a piece. The subject of this post is actually an old one of his from December last year which I thought I’d share, now that I am building an understanding of his work.

Slim Pickings, Dean Lane, Bristol, December 2017
Slim Pickings, Dean Lane, Bristol, December 2017

When Slim Pickings writes, and he has been spraying for 30 years, he sticks to the same motif with clean simple lines. The letters are TES (thank heavens I got there in the end – Slim Pickings put me through the ordeal of guessing the letters). He gave me plenty of tips about 3D work and told me that often, when he decorates the letters with patterns and the like it is often because he has some spray cans with a little bit of paint in them to finish off.

Because Slim Pickings works with the same letters, he knows exactly how much paint of each colour he will need. Kind of handy if you are travelling light. Besides being a really nice guy, I think his work makes complete sense to me and is always tidy and clean. Hats off to the man who until a couple of months ago was off my radar…d’oh.

1591. Dean Lane skate park (142)

I have always been rather fond of Hire’s work, it is wildstyle writing with a gothic twist. In this piece I am not certain, but it looks like he might have written HIRE in reverse, more likely though is that he has written something else altogether – writing can be very tough to read at times.

Hire, Dean Lane, Bristol, January 2018
Hire, Dean Lane, Bristol, January 2018

I like the colours he has selected and the depth of shading on his spiky letters. He’s also created a nice background, although it ends rather abruptly on the left hand side. Maybe he ran out of paint? A nice one from January.

1585. Dean Lane skate park (141)

Once you recognise an artist’s work and know who they are, it feels like you suddenly see their stuff everywhere. Certainly that is the case with Slip Pickings. I think I have seen his work for several years, but never posted any of it until recently. This particular piece I think is a real gem.

Slim Pickings, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2018
Slim Pickings, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2018

The forgiving shape of his letters combined with the blue cloud background and green bubble design and graded filler makes for a piece that is very easy on the eye. Even if you are not a fan of writing, it is easy to appreciate how nicely done this piece is. More to come, new and old from this No Frills artist.

1582. Dean Lane skate park (141)

I have really only been featuring work from Biers for about a year or so, since I first started to recognise his work. I have since met him several times and have enjoyed our conversations. Having contact with street artists is important in getting a better insight into their work and what makes them tick.

Biers, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2018
Biers, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2018

I know from Biers’ Instagram account that his food is important to him, as is his black book in which many of his pieces begin. Seeing his sketches gives me a real feel for his style, and for me, it is the ‘B’ that always stands out in all his work and so it is in this one.

 

1577. Dean Lane skate park (141)

Well now, this is something really different and most welcome in Dean Lane. This piece is by a visiting artist currently living and working in London, Ruki Chuki. She is originally from New York and started painting the streets in 2007, so has had plenty of time to refuine her technique and style.

Ruki Chuki, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2018
Ruki Chuki, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2018

It is her style that is so attractive and so very different from anything we usually get to see in Bristol. The picture of a couple in a tight embrace is also an unusual theme for the Bristol scene and is something we could probably do a little bit more of – spreading the love.

Ruki Chuki, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2018
Ruki Chuki, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2018

When you get to see the work of visitors I feel it is a real privilege, and one we should embrace. I guess the epitome of welcoming visiting street artists will come at the end of the month with the arrival of Upfest 2018. It really isn’t too long to wait, but long enough for the weather to turn. Let’s just keep our fingers crossed it isn’t as wet as last year.

The line up for Upfest 2018 makes eye-watering reading. Getting very excited.

1575. Dean Lane skate park (140)

This is what you get when you pair up two of Bristol’s finest writers and character artists, Dibz and Cheo.THis is a supreme collaboration with Dibz supplying the writing and Cheo paint

Dibz and Cheo, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2018
Dibz and Cheo, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2018

 

The whole piece is extra sharp and just amazingly well painted and I love the way thet Goofy almost seems to lean out of the wall, a hip hop goofy at that fully kitted out with medallion and baseball cap.

Dibz and Cheo, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2018
Dibz and Cheo, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2018

I managed to get down to see this piece quite quickly, but the margins had already been tagged – I think that might be a naughty Oner tag in the top left. Typical Bristol brilliance for all to see.