858. The Bearpit (75)

Well I told you he was prolific, and I have only just got started on posting pieces by J. Dior. This time we see some kind of mythological centaur/tiger hybrid, with an interesting foot at the end of its tail. There are some curious things going on in Dior’s head.

J. Dior, The Bearpit, Bristol, May 2017
J. Dior, The Bearpit, Bristol, May 2017

The writing ‘In the Right’ doesn’t really give many clues to what the piece is about, in fact it rather muddies the water a bit. I note that the ‘tattoo’ on the Centaur’s arm says Jadore (J’adore – ‘I love’ in French) is this deliberate or is he just playing with his name? For the time being, and until I get to ask him face to face I will continue to call him J. Dior. His style really is distinctive and unmistakable. A fun piece.

845. The Bearpit (73)

I believe this is the third J. Dior piece that I have posted on this site, and still I am oddly attracted to his naïve style. In this work we have some rather unusual reference to the ‘Caped Crusader’ but I am really rather baffled by the figure with six arms and three heads.

J. Dior, The Bearpit, Bristol, May 2017
J. Dior, The Bearpit, Bristol, May 2017

The fellow on the right appears to have a specially made super hero suite designed to show off his manhood. Whatever is going on in J. Dior’s mind in this piece is probably best kept there. As far as I’m concerned another winner. I would imagine that his work divides opinion as it may fall into the category of ‘I could probably do that’. The point is that people who say that never do…and If they did it would probably be crap. A bit like me saying that I could play football better than Wayne Rooney (even though I probably could).

821. The Bearpit (72)

This is the second piece by J. Dior that I have written about, but I can assure you that there are a great many more to come; he is most prolific. I have only really noticed his work on the streets since the Spring, so wonder if he moved into Bristol, or just decided to take the plunge and start painting on the streets.

J. Dior, The Bearpit, Bristol, May 2017
J. Dior, The Bearpit, Bristol, May 2017

His style is pretty much unique on the Bristol scene. It has a wonderful childlike naivety about it, but somehow draws you in – there are stories here. This piece is very unusual, because it features nudity, something rarely seen in street art. I am intrigued by the fact that Dior will paint a nude image, but when it comes to the writing ‘My p***y’ he doesn’t use the word pussy. I like his work, but still know nothing of the artist.

809. Gathorne Road (2)

I first saw this mural at Upfest 2016, but wasn’t sure who it was by or whether it was a festival piece. It turns out that it is by the magnificent Andrew Burns Colwill and it was not his Upfest piece, but a commission.

Andrew Burns Colwill, Gathorne Road, Bristol, May 2017
Andrew Burns Colwill, Gathorne Road, Bristol, May 2017

Colwill is a truly brilliant artist with a very colourful history, who has just completed a magnificent exhibition entitled ’20/50 Vision: Tomorrow’s Habitat’ at the It’s All 2 Much Gallery in Stokes Croft. The works place some of our most treasured species into future places where all is not as it should be. A global warming/pollution warning to us all.

Andrew Burns Colwill, Gathorne Road, Bristol, May 2017
Andrew Burns Colwill, Gathorne Road, Bristol, May 2017

This piece is altogether more mainstream, and for a marine biologist like me a real treat.

Andrew Burns Colwill, Gathorne Road, Bristol, May 2017
Andrew Burns Colwill, Gathorne Road, Bristol, May 2017

790. The Bearpit (71)

There is a new artist in town (to me at least), and his works have entered my consciousness since March really. It is possible he has been here all the time, but if this is the case I can only apologise. The artist signs his work with the name J. Dior, and try as I might, I am unable to find out anything about him. I know he is a he, because I did spot him creating a piece around Easter time.

J. Dior, The Bearpit, Bristol, May 2017
J. Dior, The Bearpit, Bristol, May 2017

His artwork embraces a naive style and usually features people, colourfully represented often in unusual positions – a touch of Marc Chagall combined with children’s illustrations. This piece doesn’t perhaps portray what I’m saying as well as some of his others. I have a fondness for these works, not because of the quality of the paintwork, but more down to the human story telling that is going on. My father, my mother – what a fine tribute to his parents. I like it, so watch this space for more from J. Dior.

750. Upfest 2016 (112)

I am feeling under a little pressure to get as many Upfest 2016 pieces posted before the end of July when the whole thing starts all over again. I think that the only way I will be able to achieve this is to shorten the narrative sections surrounding the images, which will be a Godsend for those who don’t like to read, but perhaps not so great for those who like to know a little more about the artists and the impression their work has made.

Braga Last1, Upfest, Bristol, July 2016
Braga Last1, Upfest, Bristol, July 2016

This is a wonderful piece by Braga Last1 whose owl in Dean Lane skate park I posted only a few days ago. This time he has created a beautiful rhinoceros in the school playground of Ashton Gate School.

Braga Last1, Upfest, Bristol, July 2016
Braga Last1, Upfest, Bristol, July 2016

The use of monochrome accompanied with colours spilling from the horn/tree on the rhinoceros is skilfully done, and the slight reflection of green on the head and back of the animal has been well thought through. A lovely piece.

680. North Street Hoarding (7)

This is one I have held on to for a long time, and I did so because it is a really great piece. I hadn’t published it because the artist,  Shab, has only recently come onto my radar. Of course, I am now finding his work everywhere…that seems to be the way of things.

Shab, North Street, Bristol, September 2015
Shab, North Street, Bristol, September 2015

This piece was from Upfest 2015, and managed to remain for quite some time. There are still some remnants of it there today, just. I really love this piece and the way Shab captures the figures. There is a touch of what looks like an African influence going on. A firm favourite.