Thursday doors

Doors 68. Fournier Street (Part 1)

Well I think I hit door gold last week when taking a trip to London. My sister, who lives in Stoke Newington, and I had decided to spend the day together to remember our father on the first anniversary of his death.

My sister suggested we take a walk in the Brick Lane area – I think she thought I’d enjoy showing her the street art in the area, and indeed she was right. Some of the pieces we saw are posted elsewhere on Natural Adventures.

Heading back to a bust stop near Spitalfields Market, we turned right off Brick Lane and into Fournier Street. My jaw nearly hit the floor. I explained the whole ‘Thursday Doors’ to my long-suffering sister and proceeded to snap away. Fournier street is one of those amazing East End streets that has pretty much kept its character, and rather than being knocked down in some kind of ill-thought-out gentrification project it has survived and thrived in private ownership by people who took a punt back in the 1950s/60s that these houses were worth looking after. Gilbert and George are an example of that, and if you Google them in Fournier Street, you can see articles about their house (Number 8 I think).

Enough guff… here is the first installment of Fournier Street doors:

Double double door, Brick Lane Muslim Funeral Services, Fournier Street, London April 2019
Double double door, Brick Lane Muslim Funeral Services, Fournier Street, London April 2019
Blue door and fine portico, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Blue door and fine portico, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Nice doors and great Victorian tiles, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Nice doors and great Victorian tiles, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door and swanky portico with lamp, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door and swanky portico with lamp, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door, slightly wonky, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door, slightly wonky, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door, eight panels and beautiful surround, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door, eight panels and beautiful surround, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door, is this one wonky too? Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door, is this one wonky too? Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door with splendid portico, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door with splendid portico, Fournier Street, London, April 2019

More Fournier door delight to come in Part 2 soon.

For more doors and indeed the inspiration behind Thursday Doors go and take a look at Norm 2.0 blog where there are links to yet more doors.

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Thursday doors

Doors 66. Flaine, France, 4 April 2019

No ‘chocolate box’ photographs here I’m afraid.

Flaine is a very high ski resort in the French Alps conceived in 1960 and completed in 1969. The brutalist style of concrete apartment blocks sets up a synergy or contrast with the Alpine landscape, depending on your point of view. An excellent essay on the development of Flaine by Alastair Philip Wiper can be found here and is worth a read if you are interested in architecture.

So my photographs are perhaps not what you’d expect from a skiing trip in the Alps… sorry. There are however doors, you get them everywhere, perhaps just not so quaint.

Enjoy if you can…

Double doors, funicular railway, Flaine, France, March 2019
Double doors, funicular railway, Flaine, France, March 2019
Ordinary door, Flaine, France, March 2019
Ordinary door, Flaine, France, March 2019
Door, Flaine, France, March 2019
Door, Flaine, France, March 2019
Mountain hut - what is it with the petrol? Flaine, March 2019
Mountain hut – what is it with the petrol? Flaine, March 2019
Piste basher door, Flaine, France, March 2019
Piste basher door, Flaine, France, March 2019
Piste basher door, Flaine, France, March 2019
Piste basher door, Flaine, France, March 2019

So there it is. Flaine doors (part one).

Access to more superb doors can be found at the inspired Norm 2.0 blog (check out the comments section for links)

by Scooj

 

 

Thursday doors

Doors 65

This week I have decided to share a whole bunch of doors from Bristol Temple Meads Station. Famed for its ‘passenger shed’ designed by I.K. Brunell and for being the focal point of the Great Western Railway (God’s Wonderful Railway) between London and Penzance.

Rather than photograph obvious doors in the station itself (apart from the first picture) I am sharing some of the doors located underneath the car park in front of the station. The structural archways have provided storage areas since the station was built and some have been hired out to private businesses, a common practice for railway infrastructure around the globe.

Small wooden kiosk, Temple Meads Station, Bristol
Small wooden kiosk, Temple Meads Station, Bristol

The Feature image and first picture show a small wooden kiosk just inside the main entrance of the station. I don’t know how many hundreds of times I have walked past this kiosk over the years, but I only recently noticed it. It is overlooked in one’s hurried efforts to shuffle through the barriers and onto the platforms. A little gem.

 

Doors to storeroom, Temple Meads Station, Bristol
Doors to storeroom, Temple Meads Station, Bristol
Doors to storeroom, Temple Meads Station, Bristol - why the drill holes in the bottom of the door?
Doors to storeroom, Temple Meads Station, Bristol – why the drill holes in the bottom of the door?
Doors to storeroom, Temple Meads Station, Bristol - Repair work in brick
Doors to storeroom, Temple Meads Station, Bristol – Repair work in brick
Doors to storeroom, Temple Meads Station, Bristol - Danger
Doors to storeroom, Temple Meads Station, Bristol – Danger

Finally the worst ‘best kept secret’ in Bristol – Hart’s Bakery – Creator of divine cakes, pastries, breads and life-limiting fancies. The bakery that makes it worth being early for your train to make a quick food diversion.

Hart's Bakery, Arch 35, Temple Meads Station, Bristol - Arguably the best bakery in Bristol
Hart’s Bakery, Arch 35, Temple Meads Station, Bristol – Arguably the best bakery in Bristol

So that’s it for this week.

More doors to be admired by following the links at the end of the fabulous Norm 2.0 blog: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

Until next time,

Scooj.

Thursday doors

Doors 64

Well I’m back from my short holiday in the French Alps, and have a few doors from there to share with you, but probably in a week or two. This week I am going to share five Bristol doors from alms houses and public houses… both rich veins to tap when searching for some door action.

Seeing these doors, which I consider to be fairly ordinary, as I publish them makes me realise that it is all too easy to take things for granted – one or two of them are crackers.

Enjoy…

Pub door (but not the main entrance), Bristol, March 2019
Pub door (but not the main entrance), Bristol, March 2019
Pub door, Bristol, March 2019
Pub door, Bristol, March 2019
Pub door, Bristol, March 2019
Pub door, Bristol, March 2019
Alms house door, Bristol, March 2019
Alms house door, Bristol, March 2019

Many more doors to be admired by following the links at the end of the brilliant Norm 2.0 blog: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

Until next time,

Scooj.

 

Thursday doors

Doors 63

OK, so I managed to find some more doors, but I’m afraid they are lazy doors really, because they are graffiti/street art doors which tend to be abundant in the places I regularly visit in Bristol.

Make the most of them, because there will be no doors from me next week – I am taking a short break from everything and treating myself to some fresh mountain air.

So, no more fuss…here they are:

Door, North Street, Bristol, Artist: Paul Monsters, February 2019
Door, North Street, Bristol, Artist: Paul Monsters, February 2019
Graffiti door, Leonard Lane, Bristol, March 2019
Graffiti door, Leonard Lane, Bristol, March 2019
Graffiti door, Leonard Lane, Bristol, March 2019
Graffiti door, Leonard Lane, Bristol, March 2019
Graffiti door, Stencil by John D'oh, Leonard Lane, Bristol, March 2019
Graffiti door, Stencil by John D’oh, Leonard Lane, Bristol, March 2019
Door and shutter, Cafe Cuba, Jamaica Street, Bristol, February 2019
Door and shutter, Cafe Cuba, Jamaica Street, Bristol, February 2019
Door, Jamaica Street, Bristol, February 2019
Door, Jamaica Street, Bristol, February 2019

 

More door action can be found by following the link at the end of the brilliant Norm 2.0 blog: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

Until next time,

Scooj.

 

 

Thursday doors

Doors 62 (although it might be 63)

I have been a little short of time this week so I’m afraid you’ll have to make do with a few doors picked up from my walks around Bristol. Some are rather old others from just a couple of weeks back. No theme…just doors.

Shop door with loads of door furniture, Bristol, December 2017
Shop door with loads of door furniture, Bristol, December 2017
The White Harte, Bristol, November 2017
The White Harte, Bristol, November 2017
Blue door, keyside cottage, Bristol, December 2018
Blue door, keyside cottage, Bristol, December 2018
Blue door, keyside cottage, Bristol, December 2018
Blue door, keyside cottage, Bristol, December 2018
Never surrender your imagination, Bristol, January 2019
Never surrender your imagination, Bristol, January 2019

That’s it for now, wishing you all a wonderful week.

Scooj.

Check out a great world of doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0, just follow the frog.

 

 

Thursday doors

Doors 61.

I am still struggling a little to find new doors, and haven’t done an awful lot of travelling lately, so I have retreated to my safe heartland of graffiti doors because there is never ever a shortage of them in Bristol.

The featured image door and the ones below are something of a curiosity. They appeared back in January 2017 and were attached to some walls in what I thought at the time was an effort to disrupt the work of street/graffiti artists, but I think that they might have been a part of a campaign about homelessness. Either way, they introduced a new dynamic to the Bristol scene and presented a challenge to local artists. The doors remained in situ for many months before disappearing as quickly as they had appeared.

Doors on a Wall, Moon Street, Bristol, January 2017
Doors on a Wall, Moon Street, Bristol, January 2017
Doors on a wall embellished by Ryder sitting over a Mr Klue piece, Bristol, January 2017
Doors on a wall embellished by Ryder sitting over a Mr Klue piece, Bristol, January 2017

The next few doors are classic graffiti doors in Bristol:

Coin-Op Militia, Mr Klue and DNT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2017
Coin-Op Militia, Mr Klue and DNT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2017

Spot the cat…

Door, Leonard Lane, Bristol, January 2018
Door, Leonard Lane, Bristol, January 2018
Heavily tagged door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, November 2017
Heavily tagged door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, November 2017

So that’s your lot for this week, I wish you all the very best until next Thursday.

Let yourself in to a world of doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0, just follow the frog.

by Scooj