Thursday doors

Doors 55

Just a quick selection of graffiti/street art doors from a recent trip to Shoreditch in London. Enjoy!

Shoreditch Door, London, November 2018
Shoreditch Door, London, November 2018
Shoreditch Door, London, November 2018
Shoreditch Door, London, November 2018
Shoreditch Door, London, November 2018
Shoreditch Door, London, November 2018
Shoreditch Door, London, November 2018
Shoreditch Door, London, November 2018
Shoreditch Door, London, November 2018
Shoreditch Door, London, November 2018

by Scooj

Loads more amazing doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

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Thursday doors

Door 54

At the far east end of North Street, Bristol, is the colourful Steam Crane pub, which during Upfest plays host to several walls in its beer garden/back yard. There is a little side passage just to the right of the pub which leads you directly into the yard, and the wall on the right is always crammed with great street art.

On entering into the yard, the far left-hand wall is also given over to a large piece for Upfest. Along the back brick wall however, there is no street art, except for this cheeky little red squirrel by Bristol’s Stewy, whose stencils can be found all over the city.

Thursday doors, The Steam Crane, Stewy squirrel, Bristol
Thursday doors, The Steam Crane, Stewy squirrel, Bristol

The door is plain, but the whole scene – the grey timbered facade, white door and squirrel – seem to come together in a pleasing way.

Squirrel by Stewy on a door in the back yard of The Steam Crane
Squirrel by Stewy on a door in the back yard of The Steam Crane

The squirrel is a stencil that Stewy has used many times about the place but it doesn’t matter how many times you see it, it always charms.

Here are some Upfest pieces from the walls of The Steam Crane:

Pakone, the Steam Crane, Bristol, January 2016
Pakone, the Steam Crane, Bristol, January 2016
Lost Souls, Upfest, Bristol, July 2016
Lost Souls, Upfest, Bristol, July 2016
Gemma Compton and Copyright, Upfest, Bristol, July 2017
Gemma Compton and Copyright, Upfest, Bristol, July 2017
John Curtis, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018
John Curtis, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018
Id-iom, Upfest, Bristol, July2016
Id-iom, Upfest, Bristol, July2016
Hannah Adamaszek and Saroj, Upfest, Bristol, July 2017
Hannah Adamaszek and Saroj, Upfest, Bristol, July 2017

by Scooj

Loads more amazing doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

 

Thursday doors

Doors 53

Well, I have taken a couple of weeks off from Thursday doors for two key reasons. 1) I had run out of door pictures and 2) is irrelevant because of 1).

Last Sunday I found myself in London with some time to kill, so I took off down to Shoreditch to hunt down some street art. Over the course of 4 hours or so, I took just shy of 500 pictures and walked 15 miles. While I was there I managed to find a few doors, and I am sharing the first of them here. There is, rather predictably, a strong street/graffiti art connection.

Shoreditch door, November 2018
Thursday Doors, Shoreditch, London, November 2018

These doors are in a street heavily patronised by wheatpasters – it is worth taking a moment to look at the artworks as there is a real spectrum from poor to excellent.

Shoreditch door, November 2018
Shoreditch door, November 2018

There is hardly a square inch of un-pasted door/wall and looking at it is almost like looking at an archeological dig, with different eras exposed. To many this is just a mess, to me it is individual expression in a space where freedom is tolerated/permitted.

Shoreditch door, November 2018
Shoreditch door, November 2018

by Scooj

More amazing doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

Thursday doors

Door 52

Well here you have it – one year of Thursday doors on Natural Adventures. Technically speaking I have been doing this for just over a year now, but have missed the odd week now and again. For my own satisfaction though I couldn’t really celebrate one year of Thursday doors until I had completed 52 weeks.

Just the one door this week, and one I know little about. I took the picture while on a short break in Barcelona back in March and it combines two passions…Doors and street art. I don’t know the artist, and I am way too lazy to look up much about the building the door is on, besides which I don’t think it really matters. It is just a great door.

Door, Barcelona, March 2018
Door, Barcelona, March 2018

by Scooj

More amazing doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

Thursday doors

Door 51

Bamba Bazaar, Gloucester Road, Bristol.

This is an unlikely piece of door art next door to what I guess is my local pub, The Prince of Wales, which incidentally was painted by one of my favourite Bristol artists Andrew Burns Colwill…but that is another story.

Door, Bamba Bazaar, Gloucester Road, Bristol
Door, Bamba Bazaar, Gloucester Road, Bristol

I wasn’t looking for this door, which I think has been there for some time, but kind of noticed it while I was waiting at the pedestrian lights to cross the road earlier this summer. Actually it is more of a gate than a door, but it is utterly magnificent.

Door, Bamba Bazaar, Gloucester Road, Bristol
Door, Bamba Bazaar, Gloucester Road, Bristol

The gate actually guards the entrance to two further doors (so you get three for the price of one). I would think it was commissioned by Bamba Bazaar, a shop that specialises in beads (I bought some beads there once) and was constructed by Scroller Metal Work.

Scroller Metalwork, Bamba Bazaar, Gloucester Road, Bristol
Scroller Metalwork, Bamba Bazaar, Gloucester Road, Bristol

It would be nice if more businesses put in the effort to commission something beautiful and practical like this, but it is really rather un-British. I would expect to see something like this in Barcelona or Paris and perhaps take it for granted, but here in Bristol it is a hidden gem. It pays to look around.

by Scooj

More amazing doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

Thursday doors

Door 50

Montone, Umbria, Italy.

Only one door for you this week, but it really is a pretty special door. Sited at the base of the ‘prigione e torre dell’orologio’ (prison and clock tower) at the north end of Piazza Fortebraccio in Montone, this rather small ancient door opens into a prison cell.

I am not sure how old the door is, but the tower dates back to the 14th Century.

Prison and clock tower, Piazza Fortebraccio, Montone, Umbria, August 2018
Prison and clock tower, Piazza Fortebraccio, Montone, Umbria, August 2018
Prison door, Piazza Fortebraccio, Montone, Umbria, August 2018
Prison door, Piazza Fortebraccio, Montone, Umbria, August 2018
Flag waving at the festival of the donation of the sacred thorn, Piazza Fortebraccio, Montone, Umbria, August 2018
Flag waving at the festival of the donation of the sacred thorn, Piazza Fortebraccio, Montone, Umbria, August 2018
Prison door, Piazza Fortebraccio, Montone, Umbria, August 2018
Prison door, Piazza Fortebraccio, Montone, Umbria, August 2018
Prison cell, Piazza Fortebraccio, Montone, Umbria, August 2018
Prison cell, Piazza Fortebraccio, Montone, Umbria, August 2018
Prison cell, Piazza Fortebraccio, Montone, Umbria, August 2018
Prison cell, Piazza Fortebraccio, Montone, Umbria, August 2018

More doors next wek I hope.

by Scooj

More fabulous doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

 

Thursday doors

Doors 49

‘St John’s on the Wall’

This amazing church is one of my favourite places in Bristol. Overlooked by many, it is a hidden jewel in the crown of the city, and I am certain most people simply walk past it without a second thought.

The correct name of the church is Church of St John the Baptist, but it derived its nickname from the fact that it was built onto the city wall in the 14th century. The church is long and rather narrow because it was built into the wall and its width dictated somewhat by it. The church is no longer active and is owned and looked after by the Churches conservation trust.

The last remaining gateway in the city of Bristol, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
The last remaining gateway in the city of Bristol, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol

The archway in the middle under the tower and steeple is the last remaining gateway of the old city wall. The two side passageways were added I think in the 19th century and although they look authentic, were not part of the original church. Each of the side tunnels plays host to some murals that could probably do with a bit of a refresh if I am honest. The stairway on the right of the picture is the entrance to the church.

Church of St John the Baptist, nave seen from the organ gallery, Bristol
Church of St John the Baptist, nave seen from the organ gallery

 

Once inside, you take a right turn and are immediately faced with a spectacular nave. On my most recent visit I was told that prior to the Reformation these spotless white walls would have been draped in all manner of artwork and furnishings and the place would have been heaving with atmosphere.

Oops – doors, I almost forgot…

Door on the inside of the city wall, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Door on the inside of the city wall, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Door on the inside of the city wall, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Door on the inside of the city wall, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol

From the entrance you can continue up into the tower (if you are lucky and the nice steward/warden lets you), rising up a second staircase, slipping to one side of the organ and climbing a further set of stairs, before entering into the bell tower.

Door behind the organ, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Door behind the organ, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol

One of the amazing features of this church is that some of the little rooms feel like they are exactly as they were forty or fifty years ago…time has stood still – there is something magical about this rather tatty, well-worn place.

Bell tower, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Bell tower, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol

The steward told me that I was welcome to ring some bells if I wanted to, but I bottled it…what if something went wrong?

Staff only door, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Staff only door, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol

 

There was a lovely slim ‘staff only’ door in the bell tower and I was desperate to take a little look, but again I decided I’d just leave it like it was.

Top end of the nave, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Top end of the nave, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol

At the ‘business end’ of the church there were two further doorways into a little ante-room where I guess the priest would prepare for his services, remember there are no side rooms in this church, everything lines up with the course of the city wall.

Floor tiles, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Floor tiles, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol

Looking down, the tiles are to die for.

View of the nave and organ, Church of SDt John the Baptist, Bristol
View of the nave and organ, Church of SDt John the Baptist, Bristol

Looking back in the other direction you can see the organ gallery and get a different perspective of the nave. Oh yes and there are some more doors…

Door gate to the pulpit, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Door gate to the pulpit, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Door, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Door, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Doorway, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Doorway, Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol

Finally I’ll round off this post with a little sign in the church which although very pretty might not be entirely accurate on its dates.

Sign in the Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol
Sign in the Church of St John the Baptist, Bristol

And that’s it for another week – don’t expect anything like this many doors every time!

by Scooj

More fabulous doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0