Thursday doors – 10 October 2019

Doors 85 – Fowey, Cornwall (part4)

(Originally published by mistake on Wednesday 9 October… d’oh!)

Wow! A Thursday doors on a Wednesday… how on earth did I manage that? Obviously I am not firing on all cylinders yet.

This week I am continuing with some Cornish doors from a trip to Fowey back in September and in doing so clinging on to what was the last of the decent late Summer weather – now it just rains… every day.

So here they are – dreaming of holidays by the sea.

Three locker doors in a 'beach hut' style, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Three locker doors in a ‘beach hut’ style, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Beautiful old lintle over a stable style door, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Beautiful old lintle over a stable style door, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
White door with a small black flood gate slotted in at the bottom, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
White door with a small black flood gate slotted in at the bottom, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Should we be concerned? Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Should we be concerned? Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Fine blue gate (no handle?), somewhat weathered at the base, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Fine blue gate (no handle?), somewhat weathered at the base, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Beam Reach - door with a porthole, continuing the nautical theme, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Beam Reach – door with a porthole, continuing the nautical theme, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019

Still more doors to come from Fowey, but you’ll have to wait for them. In the meantime enjoy what’s left of the week and have a lovely weekend.

Please go take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

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Thursday doors – 26 September 2019

Doors 84 – Fowey, Cornwall (part 3)

This week I will treat you with a bunch more doors from Fowey in Cornwall. I have already written two posts for ‘Thursday doors’ from this picturesque village last year and was lucky enough to visit again a week or two back during a fishing trip. There are so many great doors here that I will split them into a few posts (if that is ok with you).

Blue door, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Blue door, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Varnished wood door, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Varnished wood door, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Low green door, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Low green door, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019

Many of the doors in Fowey have rather special or unusual door knockers and the next two doors are great examples. It almost feels like there is some pride or rivalry in the village.

Blue door with bee knocker, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Blue door with bee knocker, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Close up of the door with the bee knocker, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Close up of the door with the bee knocker, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Brown door with a crab knocker, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Brown door with a crab knocker, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Close up of the door with the crab knocker (yours truly in the reflection), Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Close up of the door with the crab knocker (yours truly in the reflection), Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Grand door with a scalloped portico, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019
Grand door with a scalloped portico, Fowey, Cornwall, September 2019

Another week of doors over, I hope you liked them. Enjoy what’s left of the week and have a lovely weekend.

Please go take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

Thursday doors – 19 September

Doors 83 – Door pairs from Hotwells, Bristol

Very short of time this week, but I haven’t posted doors for a while, so here are some pairs of doors from Hotwells in Bristol. These doors are garden back doors and rather ordinary, but something about them being in pairs begins to tell us a little bit about the occupants present and past. How much do they maintain their doors, how often might they use them, do they have pets? Interestingly, none of the neighbours appear to have teamed up and gone for a joined-up approach. Enjoy.

Hotwells doors, Bristol, August 2019
Hotwells doors, Bristol, August 2019
Hotwells doors, Bristol, August 2019
Hotwells doors, Bristol, August 2019
Hotwells doors, Bristol, August 2019
Hotwells doors, Bristol, August 2019
Hotwells doors, Bristol, August 2019
Hotwells doors, Bristol, August 2019
Hotwells doors, Bristol, August 2019
Hotwells doors, Bristol, August 2019

The last one pair works for me because they are the colours of Arsenal, my football club, and incidentally also the colours of the Bristol City football club.

There we are, that’s all folks. Enjoy what’s left of the week and have a lovely weekend.

Please go take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

Thursday doors – 29 August

Doors 82 – Lanhydrock House (2)

Following on from last week’s trip to Lanhydrock House in Cornwall, this time I’ll share with you some of doors from the inside of this magnificent building.

The house dates back to the 17th century, but much of it caught fire in 1881 and following repairs at that time most of the interior furnishings including the doors are Victorian.

Hall doors with etched windows, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Entrance hall doors with etched windows, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

In true aristocratic Victorian style, there are a lot of dead (stuffed) animals in the house – trophies from colonialhunting trips.

Doors and trophy, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Doors and trophy, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

Food was a big deal in this house and the meals prepared in the kitchens were kept warm in this cabinet before being served in the dining room .

This cast iron cabinet kept the food warm between the kitchens and dining room, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
This cast iron cabinet kept the food warm between the kitchens and dining room, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

We had a kitchen towel like this when I was growing up.

One of several kitchen doors, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
One of several kitchen doors, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
The bread oven, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
The bread oven, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Dairy door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Dairy door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Upstairs door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Upstairs door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Canes - a time gone by thank goodness, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Canes – a time gone by thank goodness, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

Hmmm – there were several of these cane ‘trophies’ hanging in this room, along with plenty of dead animals – the Empire built on a bloody good caning in the headmaster’s office

Coridoor door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Coridoor door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Screen-separated drawing room, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Screen-separated drawing room, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

The drawing room was an altogether beautiful room which was broken down into sections with screens, but was actually vast.

The long gallery, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
The long gallery, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

Finally the tour of the house takes you to the stunning long gallery with its 17th century ceiling. This wing of the house was the only one that survived the fire of 1881.

So that wraps it up for another week or so. Enjoy what’s left of the week and have a lovely weekend.

Please go take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

Scooj

 

 

 

Thursday doors – 22 August

Doors 81 – Lanhydrock House (1)

Last weekend I was lucky enough to visit a National Trust property in Cornwall, south of Bodmin Moor, called Lanhydrock House. Built out of hard wearing granite, the older parts of the house date back to the 1620s, but after a fire in 1881 that started in the kitchens, two of the three wings were in part destroyed and they were rebuilt and funished in the Victorial style. The remaining wing that survived the fire retains its original walls and ceilings.

The house has been owned and managed by the National Trust since 1953, before it was owned by the Robartes family which declined significantly during the first world war. The heir, Thomas Agar-Robartes MP was killed during the battle of Loos in France while trying to rescue a soldier from no-man’s land.

There were an awful lot of doors to admire in this house, so this week I will tease you by only posting the outside doors, the rest will follow in another post.

The visit begins with a stroll through the original gatehouse dating back to the mid 17th century. Did you ever see such a grand entrance?

Lanhydrock House barbican gate added in the 1640s, Cornwall, August 2019
Lanhydrock House barbican gate added in the 1640s, Cornwall, August 2019

Then off to the left are some of the outbuildings such as the coach house. The National Trust use some of these buildings for a cafe and gift shop.

Front of door to courtyard, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Front of door to courtyard, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Same door from the other side, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Same door from the other side, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

The coach house, with stunning deep red doors, is notable for the clock and little doors below it.

Coach house doors, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Coach house doors, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

It would be wrong of me not to include this most attractive door within a door.

Perfect door within a door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Perfect door within a door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

Then to the main house itself, which had more gorgeous doors on its outside walls than I have hairs on my head (I exaggerate slightly).

One of many entrances to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
One of many entrances to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Small door to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Small door to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Larger door to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Larger door to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

The front door is probably the crowning glory of these ‘garden doors’ and dates back to the 1620s. The family crest is on the top right, and the NT lady at the door told us that the crest at the top of the door has no relation to the house or family whatsoever and nobody quite knows what it is doing there.

Main front door to the house dating back to the 17th century, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Main front door to the house dating back to the 17th century, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

So there we are. More Lanhydrock doors next time.

Please go take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

Have a great end of week and weekend.

Scooj

 

Thursday doors – 15 August

Doors 80 – Some Bristol graffiti doors

Another quick one from me this week. These doors were snapped during a street art hunting walk about a month ago in the St Paul’s area of Bristol:

Blending in with the background, Door, St Paul's, Bristol, July 2019
Blending in with the background, Door, St Paul’s, Bristol, July 2019
Nude door, St Paul's, Bristol, July 2019
Nude door, St Paul’s, Bristol, July 2019
Site Safety door, St Paul's, Bristol, July 2019
Site Safety door, St Paul’s, Bristol, July 2019
DBK door, St Paul's, Bristol, July 2019
DBK door, St Paul’s, Bristol, July 2019

I said this was a quick one, and so it is.

Please go take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

Have a great end of week and weekend.

Scooj

 

Thursday doors – 1 August

Doors 79 – Flaine, France doors (3)

Alright… I have had a couple of weeks off from Thursday doors, mainly because I have been pretty busy at work and just ran out of time. I am still pretty busy but have carved out a few moments to give you my third and final set of doors from a skiing trip to Flaine in France back in March of this year.

The ski resort was built in the brutalist style, so if you are expecting ‘chocolate box’ doors then probably best to skip the rest of this post. These doors are ugly, but even ugly doors have some fascination, in the case of most of these it is their functionality.

Enjoy if you can:

Doors on a gondola at the top of Les Grandes Platieres lift, Flaine March 2019
Doors on a gondola at the top of Les Grandes Platieres lift, Flaine March 2019
Lift hut, Flaine March 2019
Lift hut, Flaine March 2019
Door within a door, Grand Platieres, Flaine, March 2019
Door within a door, Grand Platieres, Flaine, March 2019
Dodgy two-person step on lift - self closing doors, Flaine, March 2019
Dodgy two-person step on lift – self closing doors, Flaine, March 2019
Church in the centre of 'brutalist' Flaine, March 2019
Church in the centre of ‘brutalist’ Flaine, March 2019
Doors of the church in the centre of 'brutalist' Flaine, March 2019
Doors of the church in the centre of ‘brutalist’ Flaine, March 2019
Flaine 0153 9-16 Mar 2019
Flaine 0153 9-16 Mar 2019
Post box, Flaine March 2019
Post box, Flaine March 2019

That’s it… collective relief all round. Some rather nicer doors next week, maybe.

Please go take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

Have a great end of week and weekend.

Scooj