Thursday doors – 11 July

Doors 78 – Dorchester doors (2)

A real rush to get these doors out – 10 minutes between finishing work and going off to play 5-a-side football… so not much of a story here, simply some more doors from a trip to Dorset some three weeks ago.

Door, Dorchester, June 2019
Door, Dorchester, June 2019
Door, Dorchester, June 2019
Door, Dorchester, June 2019
Door, Dorchester, June 2019
Door, Dorchester, June 2019
Door, Dorchester, June 2019
Door, Dorchester, June 2019

Sorry for rushing it, but nothing gets between me and my weekly football. Please go take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

Have a great end of week and weekend.

Scooj

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Thursday doors – 20 June 2019

Doors 75 – A walk along the River Avon cycle path.

Last Sunday was Father’s Day, and I took the opportunity to be a little self-indulgent and go off on a street art hunt to parts of Bristol city I haven’t been to before. I think that wandering around aimlessly, whether in an urban or rural setting is one of my favourite things. No plan, no map, no directions, just looking around and exploring keeping my eyes open and spotting things that might interest me.

This type of exploring is best done alone, because it involves a lot of side tracks and doubling back which could prove tiresome for any companions.

I decided to drop down onto a cycle path which runs alongside the River Avon (literally river river… Avon is derived from a word abon which means river or Afon in Welsh). The cycle path is sandwiched between the river and the backs of buildings on an industrial estate. On the opposite bank is the Paintworks, which is a reconstructed industrial estate full of rather fancy industrial/business units. The cycle path side is definitely the less salubrious of the banks.

I found a fair amount of graffiti, most of it just tagging, and an awful lot of industrial unit fire escape doors, none of which looked like they had been used in years. I share those doors with you now. I don’t expect a lot of love for these doors, but they are doors, I saw them and feel it is only fair to post them.

Rather bright yellow door, River Avon cycle path, Bristol, June 2019
Rather bright yellow door, River Avon cycle path, Bristol, June 2019
Warehouse rear door, River Avon cycle path, Bristol, June 2019
Warehouse rear door, River Avon cycle path, Bristol, June 2019
Charmingly decorated fire exit door to a warehouse, River Avon cycle path, Bristol, June 2019
Charmingly decorated fire exit door to a warehouse, River Avon cycle path, Bristol, June 2019
Door painted by Sirens, River Avon cycle path, Bristol, June 2019
Door painted by Sirens, River Avon cycle path, Bristol, June 2019
Overgrown fire exit door, River Avon cycle path, Bristol, June 2019
Overgrown fire exit door, River Avon cycle path, Bristol, June 2019

there was a bit of a contrast with the opposite bank, which had rather a wide margin of brackish plants spreading down onto the mud (the tide was out), and hosted a fair amount of wildlife including these Canada geese.

On the other side of the River Canada Geese graze in the thick estuarine mud,, River Avon cycle path, Bristol, June 2019
On the other side of the River Canada Geese graze in the thick estuarine mud, River Avon cycle path, Bristol, June 2019

 

So that is another week of doors gone by, maybe soon I’ll find some rather more attractive doors to post, but don’t bank on it.

If you’d like to see more doors take a good look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator  of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

 

Thursday doors – 13 June 2019

Doors 74 – Neglected Bristol doors

A few more doors that have seen better days, or if you’d like to look at them through a different lens, might have been given a second and rather more interesting life.

Abandoned door, Bristol, June 2019
Abandoned door, Bristol, June 2019
Is this the same abandoned door? and can you see the door behind all the posters? Stokes Croft, Bristol, June 2019
Is this the same abandoned door? and can you see the door behind all the posters? Stokes Croft, Bristol, June 2019
Jody door, North Street, Bristol, June 2019
Jody door, North Street, Bristol, June 2019
Archway and door in Leonard Lane, Bristol, March 2019
Archway and door in Leonard Lane, Bristol, March 2019
Character-building? tagged doors in Moon Street, Bristol, June 2019
Character-building? tagged doors in Moon Street, Bristol, June 2019

So there we are for another week.

If you’d like to see more doors take a good look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the orchestrator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

Thursday Doors – 16 May 2019

Doors 71 – Some Bristol doors from Hotwells – 16 May 2019

These are a series of door pictures that I took back in March on a slightly chilly, dull day as I recall. Hotwells is an area that lies on the hillside sandwiched between the floating harbour and River Avon to the south and Clifton to the North. In years gone by it was a very fashionable area reknowned for its hot springs. At the height of its popularity there was even a funicular railway that transported the well-heeled Bristolians from Clifton Village down to Hotwells and back (it is one hell of a hill).

The Clifton railway is a whole other story and maybe I should keep my powder dry to do a Thursday Doors just on that… watch this space.

So, no more guff from me… here are the doors.

313 or 16? Door, Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
313 or 16? Door, Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
313 or 16? Door, Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
313 or 16? Door, Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
A rather tired green door, Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
A rather tired green door, Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
Red and white door (the colours of Bristol City football club), Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
Red and white door (the colours of Bristol City football club), Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
This fancy window/door establishment has seen better days, Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
This fancy window/door establishment has seen better days, Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
It's all in the detail on this door, Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
It’s all in the detail on this door, Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
A bit of a lean?, Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019
A bit of a lean?, Hotwells, Bristol, March 2019

So there we have it for another week. For more door (not Mordor) mayhem take a jolly good look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the brains behind Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

 

2184. Brick Lane (4)

Sometimes you need to be eagle-eyed. Many of you will be familiar with the work of French artist C215 (Christian Guemy) and will have seen pieces by him in Paris or London, or indeed all over Europe. It is his cats in particular that he is really well known for and here is a rather old looking and very small C215 cat in Brick Lane.

C215, Brick Lane, London, April 2019
C215, Brick Lane, London, April 2019

This one was so very well ‘camouflaged’ by all the other busy scrawls on the door that if I had blinked I would have missed it. His work has such a deft touch that brings his pieces to life. I am amazed that in such a small two-tone piece, the character of the cat comes shining through. A brilliantly talented artist.

 

 

Thursday doors – 2 May 2019

Doors 70. Some Bristol doors from the Kingsdown area – 2 April 2019

If you head towards town on the Cheltenham Road (A38), to your right is a hill which leads up to Kingsdown. These doors are on the sleepy and rather steep streets in that area that appear to have little traffic, making standing in the road taking pictures less hazardous than usual.

Taken a few weeks ago on a rather sunny morning. Enjoy.

Two reasonably ordinary garden gates and Banksy's Rose Trap behind perspex, Kingsdown, Bristol, March 2019
Two reasonably ordinary garden gates and Banksy’s Rose Trap behind perspex, Kingsdown, Bristol, March 2019
Door on a steep hill, Kingsdown, Bristol, March 2019
Door on a steep hill, Kingsdown, Bristol, March 2019
Another door on a steep hill, Kingsdown, Bristol, March 2019
Another door on a steep hill, Kingsdown, Bristol, March 2019
The Hillgrove, Kingsdown, Bristol, March 2019
The Hillgrove, Kingsdown, Bristol, March 2019
Windows from a bygone era... a smoke room, can you believe it?
Windows from a bygone era… a smoke room, can you believe it?
One of those doors that was a door but is no longer a door, Kingsdown, Bristol, March 2019
One of those doors that was a door but is no longer a door, Kingsdown, Bristol, March 2019
A secret garden door. We like those. Kingsdown, Bristol, April 2019
A secret garden door. We like those. Kingsdown, Bristol, April 2019

That’s your lot for this week.

If you like doors and want to see more from around the globe then visit the inspiration behind Thursday Doors go and take a look at Norm 2.0 blog where there are links to yet more doors in the commemnts at the end.

by Scooj

 

Thursday doors

Doors 68. Fournier Street (Part 1)

Well I think I hit door gold last week when taking a trip to London. My sister, who lives in Stoke Newington, and I had decided to spend the day together to remember our father on the first anniversary of his death.

My sister suggested we take a walk in the Brick Lane area – I think she thought I’d enjoy showing her the street art in the area, and indeed she was right. Some of the pieces we saw are posted elsewhere on Natural Adventures.

Heading back to a bust stop near Spitalfields Market, we turned right off Brick Lane and into Fournier Street. My jaw nearly hit the floor. I explained the whole ‘Thursday Doors’ to my long-suffering sister and proceeded to snap away. Fournier street is one of those amazing East End streets that has pretty much kept its character, and rather than being knocked down in some kind of ill-thought-out gentrification project it has survived and thrived in private ownership by people who took a punt back in the 1950s/60s that these houses were worth looking after. Gilbert and George are an example of that, and if you Google them in Fournier Street, you can see articles about their house (Number 8 I think).

Enough guff… here is the first installment of Fournier Street doors:

Double double door, Brick Lane Muslim Funeral Services, Fournier Street, London April 2019
Double double door, Brick Lane Muslim Funeral Services, Fournier Street, London April 2019
Blue door and fine portico, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Blue door and fine portico, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Nice doors and great Victorian tiles, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Nice doors and great Victorian tiles, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door and swanky portico with lamp, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door and swanky portico with lamp, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door, slightly wonky, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door, slightly wonky, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door, eight panels and beautiful surround, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door, eight panels and beautiful surround, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door, is this one wonky too? Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door, is this one wonky too? Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door with splendid portico, Fournier Street, London, April 2019
Door with splendid portico, Fournier Street, London, April 2019

More Fournier door delight to come in Part 2 soon.

For more doors and indeed the inspiration behind Thursday Doors go and take a look at Norm 2.0 blog where there are links to yet more doors.