2841. Waterloo Street (1)

I cannot begin to explain why it has taken me so long to post this outstanding piece by Deamze, especially as I am a lifelong fan of Goscinny and Uderzo’s Asterix the Gaul books. I guess that part of the reason is that my words simply can’t do justice to the genius of this piece, and so I left it, always meaning to come back to it.

Deamze, Waterloo Street, Bristol, October 2018
Deamze, Waterloo Street, Bristol, October 2018

I rarely use the word genius, but I atcually think that Deamze is the absolute master of his craft and in this work, he has mashed up characters in the correct colour palette from Uderzo’s illustrations to draft out his name in his own style and it is all utterly commensurate with the ethos of the comic books. This is interpretive art at its very, very best.

Deamze, Waterloo Street, Bristol, October 2018
Deamze, Waterloo Street, Bristol, October 2018

Deamze leaving Bristol for Hobart is surely one of the greatest creative losses for the city, and I am full of jealousy when I see his work from the other side of the world on Instagram. Maybe sometime he’ll pay us all a visit and drop a few pieces while he’s at it. One of my all-time pieces of Bristol street art.

2826. M32 roundabout J3 (200)

Figuring this one out might be a challenge for those unfamiliar with Bristol artists, because the word VODKA might have little meaning and certainly isn’t a name we see here. Regular readers will all have seen an awful lot of work by this artist in Natural Adventures and so might be familiar with the letter shapes and style.

Soker, M32 roundabout, Bristol, March 2020
Soker, M32 roundabout, Bristol, March 2020

It is of course by Soker and a gentle nod to artist Vodka (@ren_jeffys). It is a beautifully conceived and executed piece down on the M32 roundabout. Soker has been on fire over the last month or so – it will be interesting to see if he continues as the Coronavirus restrictions grow.

2819. Dean Lane skate park (293)

From the feature image it is difficult to gauge the significance of this collaborative wall from little more than a week ago in Dean Lane skate park. I gave you a little hint earlier this week with a piece by Rusk which is on the left hand side of this wall behind the fence and which can’t be viewed from this vantage point.

Soker, Inkie and Hemper, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020
Soker, Inkie and Hemper, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020

I had decided to take the dog for a walk to Dean Lane and talk about being in the right place at the right time… this was it, and so utterly random that I had chosen to go down there. Not only were Soker, Inkie and Hemper busy doing their thing, but Rusk was also there and watching on were The Agent, Angus, DJ Perks and Tes (Slim Pickings).

Soker and Inkie, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020
Soker and Inkie, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020

It was a little bit like I had died and gone to graffiti heaven. To see these established writers all at work simultaneously was a rare treat indeed, and that other artists who had been tipped-off were watching on made the whole thing feel extra special.

Inkie and Hemper, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020
Inkie and Hemper, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020

I had met all the artists before with the exception of Hemper who seems to have had something of a renaissance of late, but this wasn’t really the right time to introduce myself, more an opportunity to watch how these guys go about their businness.

Soker, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020
Soker, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020

Soker’s chrome piece on the left is near perfect and spells out Sokem (the R and M are interchangeable in his name). The photographs of the finished pieces were taken a day or two later.

Inkie, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020
Inkie, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020

Inkie’s central panel is classic Inkie and whilst also in chrome stands out due to the deep 3D shading in a striking scarlet colour. This is the third Inkie I have seen so far this year which is not bad going especially as there haven’t been any festivals in that time.

Hemper, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020
Hemper, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020

I am less well acquainted with Hemper’s work simply because he hasn’t painted as much as the others until relatively recently. Again in chrome, this third panel of the triptych mirrors the colours of Soker’s piece on the left to give some symmetry to the collaborative work. A landmark wall and a red letter day.

Soker, Inkie and Hemper, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020
Soker, Inkie and Hemper, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2020

2799. M32 roundabout J3 (199)

I’m not sure I would have known that this ‘Blistolian’ piece was by Soker if I hadn’t seen it tagged on Instagram, although it does have all the hallmarks of a highly accomplished artist and was painted alongside a Hemper pece so was likely to be by one of the big boys of Bristol street art.

Soker, M32 roundabout, Bristol, February 2020
Soker, M32 roundabout, Bristol, February 2020

It seems that Soker has ‘awoken’ from a fairly quiet winter period on the streets, with a couple of new works including this one. It is unusual for Soker to write something other than his name, but it does happen from time to time and the script fot used in this one is an absolute winner.

2783. St Werburghs tunnel (151)

Woah, what happened here? Thank you Paul H for pointing out that the commentary  about this piece was missing. A WordPress glitch I think, and most annoying as I had spent quite some time putting together some words to accompany this advert piece in the tunnel by Inkie. I find that I am always caught in two minds with advert pieces, because they take away the edge from street art and swerve into commercialism. There is nothing wrong with that per se and almost always they are promoting local music, so I suppose I should just get with the programme.

Inkie, St Werburghs, Bristol, February 2020
Inkie, St Werburghs, Bristol, February 2020

The piece itself is written in classic Inkie font and promotes the album Ease and Squeeze by Kaotik Kartel, a reggae/dancehall/dub band from Bristol/Jamaica. I don’t actually mind too much what Inkie is painting about, it is always great to see his work and this one in the tunnel was a great surprise.

2781. Armada Place (18)

It is very nice to see a character piece from Rusk, and this is a bit of fun constructed around the theme of magic mushrooms. Is that still a thing? I am so old. It is also good to see these boards, which in my view are underused and underrated, getting the treatment from some of the best artists in Bristol.

Rusk, Armada Place, Bristol, February 2020
Rusk, Armada Place, Bristol, February 2020

This piece does its job well: the pun; the psychedelic colour selections and the execution come together to create fabulous whole. It would be great to see more turnover on this wall… especially as it is reasonably quick for me to walk there.

2776. Gloucester Road, Filthy XIII

It is strange how you can notice something for the first time and then start wondering how long the thing you have just noticed has been there, and so it is with this Sepr commission on the facia sign for Filthy XIII just near the arches on Gloucester Road.

Sepr, Gloucester Road, Bristol, February 2020
Sepr, Gloucester Road, Bristol, February 2020

On a wet walk to work I spotted this piece and was really rather taken by it. As with all Sepr pieces, the cartoon style character, looking like an illustration from the 1960s is part of an unfolding story involving a dog and some birds and drink.

Sepr, Gloucester Road, Bristol, February 2020
Sepr, Gloucester Road, Bristol, February 2020

I don’t think I’ll ever get bored of Sepr’s work and my only criticism is that I just don’t get to see enough of it. At least I can enjoy this one every time I walk to work.