3259. M32 Spot (84)

All too often there are some really nice pieces that are easily overlooked. In skate parks this happens frequently because any ramp street art tends to get scuffed, damaged and tagged really quickly. Fortunately I managed to find this lovely writing from Nightwayss before it got too bashed about.

Nightways, M32 Spot, Bristol, Setember 2020
Nightways, M32 Spot, Bristol, Setember 2020

Sadly there are no monkeys, but the writing is very nice and the style and colour selections very typical of the artist. I have seen Nightwayss use this grey colour an awful lot in his work which in itself is not unusual for graffiti writers, but he uses it more artistically than is the case for most throw ups that you see about the place. My guess is that this is one of those pieces that goes largely overlooked… not by me though.

3257. St Werburghs tunnel (200)

I simply haven’t posted enough of Stiv’s work, but I guess the same could be said for a majority of Bristol artists. With publishing only two posts each day on Natural Adventures I am never going to be able to cover everything. At the end of each month I would guess that I only post about a third to a half of the pieces I record. Something for me to do in retirement perhaps?

Stivs, St Werburghs, Bristol, October 2020
Stivs, St Werburghs, Bristol, October 2020

I think that thhis tribute piece must be in some way connected to the tribute collaboration with Frank Riot at the other end of the tunnel, because both are dedicated to a friend who died two years ago and was connected to the music industry. The letters are utterly awesome and the movement and vibe dancing off the piece give off a sense of sound and dance. A fine piece with meaning.

3256. M32 cycle path (79)

An artist that I feel I don’t see nearly enough of is Logoe. I first encountered his work in April 2017 while he was collaborating with Silent Hobo, and it was on that occasion that I was told that Logoe was returning to painting on the streets after a long lay-off, and that he had been a bit of a legend in the past – Silent Hobo’s words.

Logoe, M32 Cycle path, Bristol, October 2020
Logoe, M32 Cycle path, Bristol, October 2020

This piece is typical of his thin hand-written style letters. The letters are beautifully picked out spelling Logoe, but it is the additional decorations that bring the writing to life. The dots through the middle and horizontal thin lines that at first I thought were drips add real interest. It is always really good to stumble across one of these.

3251. Brunel Way bridge (64)

As I see it, Slim Pickings (TES) creates his pieces in two forms; a high-end version of his letters with immaculate fills and clean lines and considered colour schemes and his throw-up versions that are a little bit more ‘street’ if you get my meaning. This one falls ever so slightly more into the second category.

Slim Pickings, Brunel Way, Bristol, October 2020
Slim Pickings, Brunel Way, Bristol, October 2020

I have to say that I am not too keen on the salmon pink colour and I think the ‘stitch’ lines on the edge of the letters make the piece a little untidy in my opinion. I ought to add that I might be overthinking this and being slightly picky. I always welcome Slim Pickings’ letters in whatever shape or form they come in.

3250. Turbo Island

Well I’m not sure how I missed this one first time round, but I just had a little potter around in my archives and once I found it I couldn’t really ignore it. It is a tidy collaboration from Mr Klue and DNT, who quite often get together to paint, from those heady days before coronavirus was a thing in the UK… remember that?

Mr Klue and DNT, Turbo Island, Bristol, February 2020
Mr Klue and DNT, Turbo Island, Bristol, February 2020

I can’t decide whether the shopping trolley is really annoying or actually adds a little bit of character to the photograph. No matter, it is there. The very ‘DNT’ monster embedded within the Mr Klue writing is a window into the artist’s mind and like so many of his characters is part organic, part mechanical. It looks likes the puffs of yellow smoke are puffing out of one of the legs of the character. A nice collaboration.

3247. Brunel Way bridge (63)

There are two graffiti writers that I am really enjoying seeing at the moment and they are Phour and Pl8o, both emerging as great writing talents to add to the long list in the city. This is a recent piece by Pl80 on the long wall facing the river.

Pl8o, Brunel Way, Bristol, September 2020
Pl8o, Brunel Way, Bristol, September 2020

Pink is a colour that seems to be coming back into fashion and as with other pink pieces about the place it works very nicely indeed with blue. The 3D shadow is nicely done and the red details and yellow stars work very nicely in this piece. Probably Pl8o’s greatest asset though is the shape of the letter/number combination he uses it is very pleasing to the eye and full of lovely curves.

3245. St Werburghs tunnel (198)

It would seem that this piece from Smak was painted at the same time as Inkie and Tizer painted it recently and that there was something of a paint jam going on. I think that Hemper and one or two others might also have been involved. I have to admit that paint jams in the tunnel are not my favourite because the poor lighting never does justice to the artwork.

Smak, St Werburghs, Bristol, October 2020
Smak, St Werburghs, Bristol, October 2020

As always the work of Smak is of a consistently high quality and there is a lot here to admire in both shape and colour. Each letter is painted with care and attention and there is a phenomenal amount of detail and design behind each one. Another great piece of graffiti writing.

3243. St Werburghs tunnel (196)

What a lovely surprise to come across this Tizer piece so soon after his last visit to Bristol. I rather hope that this is going to become a bit of a ‘thing’. This one was painted alongside Inkie and is in the expected writing/character format that Tizer favours.

Tizer, St Werburghs, Bristol, October 2020
Tizer, St Werburghs, Bristol, October 2020

The colours are a little comprimised due to the lighting in the tunnel, particularly on the left side of the piece where the yellow tones start to dominate. Consistent with his way of working, I suspect that the piece is freestyled, which gives the letters a freedom that some rather more formulaic writers might struggle with. The multi-coloured fills are superbly well done and the female character on the left is sporting a fine pair of specs. More please.

3240. St Werburghs tunnel (196)

You know that the world has gone all topsy-turvy when Inkie hits so many walls in Bristol in such a short time. I am not complaining mind, and it is perhaps one of the few upsides of the coronavirus epidemic that Inkie seems to be spending more time in his native Bristol.

Inkie, St Werburghs, Bristol October 2020
Inkie, St Werburghs, Bristol October 2020

This is a recent piece in the tunnel painted alongside Tizer who has made two visits to Bristol in as many months. This is a lovely four-colour filled piece blended horizontally in two contrasting hues. Slightly less elaborate than some of his Oieces, but beautifully decorated with hearts and stars. Always, always great to find an Inkie piece.

3239. St Werburghs tunnel (195)

Yep, he’s back. This is just one of several new pieces by Slim Pickings (Tes) to appear over the last couple of weeks in Bristol. After a long quiet period, he has let loose again and there seem to be one or two adjustments to his ‘normal’ form of letters.

Slim Pickings, St Werburghs, Bristol, October 2020
Slim Pickings, St Werburghs, Bristol, October 2020

This one in the tunnel is slapped over another piece, almost like a sticker, in the fine tradition of throw ups, but this is a classy and beautifully finished type of throw up. Unfortunately the light in the tunnel kind of bleaches out any colours, so the piece looks a little bland. One of the variations that has crept in is the tightness in the curve of the S, an interesting development for those who study such things.

Slim Pickings, Dean Lane, Bristol, January 2020
Slim Pickings, Dean Lane, Bristol, January 2020