1596. St Werburghs tunnel (29)

Another piece from the gathering at St Werburghs at the end of May is by one of my favourite Bristol abstract artists Mr Klue. This work sees the return of the crazy top hat and headless figure with a shirt and very long tie.

Mr Klue, St Werburghs, Bristol, July 2018
Mr Klue, St Werburghs, Bristol, July 2018

I have always been very struck by the calmness and meditative quality of Mr Klue’s pieces, in part generated by the subtle colour selections but also by the gentle shapes and soft edges. I haven’t seen much from the artist for an absolute age, so seeing this and another one in the tunnel in one visit was really something special.

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1540. Upfest 2017 (173)

One of the more academic and mind-blowing pieces at Upfest 2017 was this absolutely stunning classical style piece by Mezla. I managed to catch up with him while he was painting this piece and he said that he was supposed to be using the boards down at Ashton Gate, but that he found the music just a little bit too loud for his liking, so he crossed over the road and found this wall.

Mezla, Upfest, Bristol, July 2017
Mezla, Upfest, Bristol, July 2017

I absolutely love the way he has combined abstract work with some life form, and the subtle shades and colours are perfect. This really is one of my favourites from Upfest 2017 and is so very different from pretty much everything else on display.

Mezla, Upfest, Bristol, July 2017
Mezla, Upfest, Bristol, July 2017

I don’t think I can praise this piece highly enough. His Upfest biography reeveals how he started off as a writer but has moved on since.

1522. The Bearpit (149)

Once again I am introducing an artist new to these pages…I don’t know how I’m going to keep up with only two posts a day. Some good work may never see the light of day. This fine abstract piece is by Bristol-based artist Run Z, and it is one of two that I hve spotted in Bristol. I have not been aware of his work before and I think he is reasonably new to the scene.

Run Z, The Bearpit, Bristol, May 2018
Run Z, The Bearpit, Bristol, May 2018

There aren’t too many abstract artists on the streets of Bristol, so Run Z is among the elite group that includes Mr Klue and Decay, both of whose work I admire. This piece uses complementary colours in organic swirls, creating an overall effect that is rather pleasing to the eye. If you look close up, it is all a bit raw, but step back and it makes sense. Nice to see something a bit different.

1476. Millpond Street (3)

My understanding is that every now and again, Bristol Drain Services like to give their office building a makeover. They provide the paint and the artists crete something special. This wall which was previously occupied by Kid Crayon and SPZero76 has recently been given an abstract refresh by the fabulous Paul Monsters.

Paul Monsters, Millpond Street, Bristol, May 2018
Paul Monsters, Millpond Street, Bristol, May 2018

His colourful geometric designs are instantly recognisable and can lift any wall, no matter how bland, into the status of artwork. I hope to catch up with Paul in the run up to Upfest 2018, or at the very least at the festival itself, for which he is one of the central organisers.

1447. The Bearpit (136)

Painted in The Bearpit for the Spring Paint Jam, this unusual piece is the work of the versatile Bristol artist Georgie. Georgie is a leading light in bringing street art to the people of Bristol through paint jams and her determination to preserve the notion of legal walls for the many street/graffiti artists in the city.

Georgie, The Bearpit, Bristol, April 2018
Georgie, The Bearpit, Bristol, April 2018

This piece itself is a stunning and intricate stencil work, which has been skilfully layered to create rich visual textures as you run your eye across it. Furthermore it is the kind of work that you don’t see enough of in The Bearpit.

Georgie, The Bearpit, Bristol, April 2018
Georgie, The Bearpit, Bristol, April 2018

When you take a close look, you can really see all the detailed work that has gone into creating this piece. Hats off to Georgie.

1393. The Bearpit (127)

Although I am confident this is a Tom Miller piece, with his trademark explosion of swirling colours, it is not signed, and so there is that tiny little nagging doubt about it. However, since nobody else in Bristol paints like this, I will attribute it to him anyway.

Tom Miller, The Bearpit, Bristol, February 2108
Tom Miller, The Bearpit, Bristol, February 2108

I’m not sure if it is still there or not, it has been a week or two since I did any street art hunting in Bristol, but most of his recent stuff has been tagged and oversprayed unnecessarily quickly, which is pretty annoying really.

Tom Miller, The Bearpit, Bristol, February 2108
Tom Miller, The Bearpit, Bristol, February 2108

In this piece, a motif he uses a lot, a heart, is surrounded by a chaos of colour. A nice piece.

 

 

1388. The Bearpit (126)

Going back just a little, I found this unusual collaboration between Decay and Dirtystreetart. QI know a lot about the former and have posted a lot of his work here, the latter though is new to me, and I am guessing that he was visiting Bristol.

Decay and Dirtystreetart, The Bearpit, Bristol, November 2017
Decay and Dirtystreetart, The Bearpit, Bristol, November 2017

I think this collaboration works really well, Decay adding some green to his usual red white and black abstract work fusing brilliantly with the photorealistic ant in the middle of the piece by Dirtystreetart.

Decay and Dirtystreetart, The Bearpit, Bristol, November 2017
Decay and Dirtystreetart, The Bearpit, Bristol, November 2017

I was pleased to get this shot of the piece, because it didn’t get to hang around for too long before getting sprayed over. I’m not sure if these two have collaborated before, but I think this works well, and I would certainly like to see more from the pair.

Decay and Dirtystreetart, The Bearpit, Bristol, November 2017
Decay and Dirtystreetart, The Bearpit, Bristol, November 2017

Having just checked out Dirtystreetart on the Interweb, it turns out he comes from Cheltenham, as does Decay, before he made his home in Bristol, which would go some way to explaining this collaboration.