2084. Stokes Croft, Turbo Island (4)

Yet another amazing surprise from a week or two back walking on my way to work was this magnificent collaboration by DNT and Hazard. Previously this wall had hosted a fine collaboration by Soap, Hazard and Tasha Bee.

Hazard and DNT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2019
Hazard and DNT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2019

I haven’t seen any animals by Hazard before, only pictures of people’s faces, so this was definitely a lovely new insight for me. The Tiger’s face is brilliantly painted using as spectrum of white through to black spray paints, and it works perfectly on this wall.

Hazard and DNT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2019
Hazard and DNT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2019

The whole piece is brightened up with colourful writing by DNT on then left and Hazard on the right. The only thing I am n ot certain about here is whether Hazard’s name was by her or DNT. If it was by Hazard, then this is another first for me. Turbo Island is becoming a really great spot once again thanks to the efforts of PRSC and others who are working hard to make use of this wall.

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2032. Stokes Croft

I am going back a long way (December 2015) through my archive now to share this piece by DNT and another artist, possibly Mr Sleven, but I am not sure. I really don’t know why I have held on to this for so long, because it is a fine and rather unusual collaboration next to the Matchbox Gallery.

DNT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, December 2015
DNT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, December 2015

The ‘stone’ cherub is by DNT, and for a while there were a few of these dotted around the area. I have a feeling that the cherub sitting in a pile of spray cans is a stencil, which is a surprise as I’m not aware of any other stencils by DNT.

DNT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, December 2015
DNT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, December 2015

I love the way the whole thing is black and white apart from little flashes of colour on the spray cans. A memorable piece.

2022. Stokes Croft

Something a bit different today. Where Stokes Croft and City Road meet, there are some poster frames on a wall, which I think have been installed by the People’s Republic of Stokes Croft (PRSC). The posters here could easily be mistaken for the random advertising we are subjected to on a daily basis and which we tend to ignore and filter out as white noise. But take a slightly closer look and you’ll see something quite different.

Unknown artist, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019
Unknown artist, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019

I don’t know who the artist(s) is/are that put these posters together, but I thoroughly enjoy seeing them when I walk past. Often with some political undertone the wry humour shines through. The first is of a spoof Evening Standard (check the spelling) billboard, stating that ‘things can only get bitter’ a direct reference to the current Brexit crisis that continues to divide the country.

Unknown artist, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019
Unknown artist, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019

The next poster shows a portrait of David Cameron with paper peeling off where his face is to reveal large corporate office blocks (banks?) behind – surely they are not suggesting the ex PM was driven by capitalist ideology..?

Unknown artist, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019
Unknown artist, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019

The third poster is a commentary on the ‘social media brain drain’ with a character, loosely based on Mickey Mouse encouraging people to look up from their phones. I wonder how many people look up and read this poster…not many I would guess.

All of these posters are provocative and humorous and I’ll keep looking out for more. Perhaps I’ll get lucky and find out who is behind them too.

Thursday doors

Doors 59

This week I thought I’d share a few of the doors I encounter every time I walk to work, with one or two that are set back a little from my main route. Most are from Stokes Croft, arguably the most ‘colourful’ stretch of road in Bristol (which is some achievement let me tell you).

The first two doors are neighbours, one maintained rather better than the other. It is the awnings over these doors that I love, and which are so typical of some of the older houses in Bristol, although many no longer exist at all…War effort?

Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019
Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019
Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019
Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019

The next three doors are typical of the heavy tagging that goes on in this district. Nearly all of the housing in the area is rented accommodation, and landlords seem to be resigned to the futility of removing the tagging and graffiti – it is an accepted norm here. Having said that, I noticed this week that a couple of buildings have had a makeover and the walls and doors are all freshly painted…a blank canvass?

Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019
Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019
Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019
Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019
Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019
Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019

The last door I have meant to include here before but never had the right story to tell with it. As a small enterprise just off Stokes Croft, it fits the bill nicely and rounds off this week’s doors.

Door, Wilder Street, Bristol, January 2019
Door, Wilder Street, Bristol, January 2019

More next week. Go check out a whole ton more doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

by Scooj

 

1982. Stokes Croft, the Canteen

There is a new piece in town on one of the most famous walls in Bristol thanks to Banksy’s ‘Mild Mild West’ piece, which I am privileged to enjoy every time I walk to work. I had noticed a short while ago that the wall below had been prepped and there was a notice indicating that something new was going to be painted soon.

Soker, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019
Soker, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2019

The piece in question is this ‘study’ by Soker (yes two Soker posts in a row), and when I first saw it I thought it was incomplete. I read subsequently that it is a piece designed to look like a sketch on lined paper with annotations. In meeting that brief, Soker has once again excelled and the piece will be keeping good company with the teddy bear above. Clever stuff.

1978. Stokes Croft, The Carriageworks (39)

You can tell this one is from the archives, not just from the date on the caption, but because it is on the wall of the Carriageworks, which for the last several months has been behind fences and screens while the building is being demolished and reconstructed for ‘affordable’ housing.

Nevla, Stokes Croft, Bristol, April 2018
Nevla, Stokes Croft, Bristol, April 2018

It is a quick one by Nevla, I think the last of his that I have from a while ago. It is a nice simple cartoon character, and from the look of it he was running low on paint. Nevla’s work always has a light-hearted  touch, which is refreshing really against a landscape of bile and hatred that exists in the UK at the moment.

1796. Stokes Croft

Inkie has a good relationship going with the Full Moon in Stokes Croft, and is frequently asked to paint their advertising hoardings on the railings of the pub for future events. I am often caught in two minds about whether this kind of art is street art or something altogether different. It is where commercial interests and street art come together at the commissioning end of the spectrum. In this instance I have posted the piece, because it demonstrates Inkie’s range more than some of his other pieces.

Inkie, Stokes Croft, Bristol, October 2018
Inkie, Stokes Croft, Bristol, October 2018

I really like this hoarding with its ‘circus’ font, but the highlight for me is the face on the left hand side of the piece. I am much more used to seeing the Inkie profile portrait of a girl with flowing hair, in this work we see something quite different and in keeping with the spirit of a Day of the Dead themed Halloween party at the pub.

Inkie, Stokes Croft, Bristol, October 2018
Inkie, Stokes Croft, Bristol, October 2018

If the piece had not been signed, I might have had difficulty in identifying the artist, so different is it from his usual style. A good piece (even if it is an advertisement).