2966. Stokes Croft

This piece from Decay was painted around the time of the introduction of lock down and was a great message for people to take the lock down restrictions seriously. Street artists have definitely played their party in broadcasting good messages during this pandemic. More recently some works are a little more critical of the government’s handling of the situation, but no surprises there.

Decay, Stokes Croft, Bristol, May 2020
Decay, Stokes Croft, Bristol, May 2020

Decay is such a consistent artist always putting out clean and tidy writing beautifully executed. There is one thing that perplexes me about this piece, and it is the eyes with wings bookending the writing. Are these the work of Decay or another artist? I think it is Decay, but it isn’t quite in his style. Answers on a postcard…

2949. Stokes Croft

Following on from Yesterday’s rare unearthed Laic217 piece is this equally rare Kid Crayon piece from my archive. I usually post Kid Crayon’s work pretty shortly after I have photographed it because I like it and am keen to share it. This Star Wars piece was painted on the side of the Matchbox Gallery at a time when it had an exhibition of Star Wars work, probably coinciding with May the fourth, 2017. (May the fourth be with you)

Kid Crayon, Stokes Croft, Bristol, May 2017
Kid Crayon, Stokes Croft, Bristol, May 2017

Although not wholly looking like Carrie Fisher, we all know exactly who this character is and that is what matters. The double-bun hairstyle is possibly one of the most iconic ever. It is unusual to see a piece like this from Kid Crayon, which makes it all the more special. I’m not sure who painted the R2D2, but have a feeling it might have been DNT.

No… I am your father.

2914. Stokes Croft

Another archive piece, this time from #DFTE, on the famous wall on the corner of Stokes Croft and City Road. This is one of #DFTE’s framed pieces, and if I am honest, I’m not entirely certain that it is still there.

#DFTE, Stokes Croft, Bristol, April 2019
#DFTE, Stokes Croft, Bristol, April 2019

The words ‘We are all in this together‘ have a certain poignancy about them today as we sit in the midst of a global pandemic. I like the sentiment, but I dislike the way our government have rolled out this slogan (as if it was their invention) to try and inject some patriotism and collective responsibility for the fallout of coronavirus. I feel a monumental rant cominng on, so I will end the post now before I bore the living daylights out of you. In cheerier times I would appreciate the words more. I am a big fan of the artist and his alternative style.

2896. Hepburn Road (15)

Tucked away in a lane not usually associated with Kid Crayon was this rather unusual two-tone piece from July 2017. One of the things that I would often associate with Kid Crayon is his abundant use of colour, so this was something of a change.

Kid Crayon, Hepburn Road, Bristol, July 2017
Kid Crayon, Hepburn Road, Bristol, July 2017

My guess is that this was a quick one that was more for his own amusement than for public display. I love finding works like this, because they show another side of an artist and the range and diversity of their work. Without the signature, this would be quite difficult to identify as a KC piece. I’m not sure what the speech bubble says, but it looks like ‘wired’ to me. Does it refer to KC himself or to the character of the piece?

2870. Stokes Croft

This piece, in the heart of Stokes Croft came as a complete surprise to me on one of my Covid-19 dog walks last week. It is by the wonderful Pekoe and painted over one of her previous pieces here, and from that I can guess that this is one of her favoured spots.

Pekoe, Stokes Croft, Bristol, April 2020
Pekoe, Stokes Croft, Bristol, April 2020

There is always a lot of emotion in Pekoe’s pieces, sometimes happy, often sad, but this one look different particularly downcast. Maybe the sadness is reflective of the Coronavirus pandemic and all the baggage that comes with it.

All the trademarks are here, a colourful face, big hair in multi-colours with lots of symbols in it and a tear. Another fine piece from Pekoe.

Pekoe, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2018
Pekoe, Stokes Croft, Bristol, January 2018

2864. Stokes Croft

I thought I had posted all my pictures of French artist Tian’s wheatpastes in Bristol from a visit he made in May last year, but I was mistaken, and the opportunity that Covid-19 has given me to ‘look back’ has unearthed a whole bunch more of which this is one.

Tian, Stokes Croft, Bristol, May 2019
Tian, Stokes Croft, Bristol, May 2019

I love Tian’s work and that he has twice visited Brisol in recent years and left us these wonderful pasteups is a real privilege. I’m not sure who the sepia-tinted woman featured is, it might be Jane Fonda? Or possibly it isn’t anyone famous. No matter, it is beautiful in my eyes. More to come, and possibly a gallery soon.

2834. Turbo Island

This one is not for the easily offended, and if graffiti cock ‘n’ balls are not your thing, I think you might need to move on pretty swiftly. This is a rather mischievous collaboration between The Cat Came Back and DNT on the Turbo Island wall.

The Cat Came Back, Turbo Island, Bristol, January 2020
The Cat Came Back, Turbo Island, Bristol, January 2020

On the left is the cock – one of graffiti’s most enduring images – that is part cock, part cat. I can’t quite make out the writing, but I think it says ‘I’m Cat’. You can make up your own minds about this one.

DNT, Turbo Island, Bristol, January 2020
DNT, Turbo Island, Bristol, January 2020

On the right is another kind of robot sort of creation from DNT. The whole collaboration looks like it was painted in a bit of a hurry or under the influence of alcohol/other. A bit of fun for some.

Thursday doors – 26 March 2020

Doors 99 – Dog walk doors

What a week. This is my first Thursday doors post since the lock down was imposed in the UK, and it is a very unsettling and confusing time for us all. Under our rules we are allowed one outing a day for personal exercise, provided we follow all the social distancing rules.

I am alternating my exercise of choice between working on the allotment and walking the dog (in my wildest dreams I never thought that the dog would offer me the means of temporary escape from ‘house arrest’). Yesterday we took a walk down to Stokes Croft and Montpelier and, never one to pass up an opportunity, I photographed some doors.

Just in case you thought this might be irresponsible, I kept my distance from the few people that were out (mostly, like me, exercising in some way), and carried out all the necessary hand washes before leaving and on return home. One observation was that I saw more homeless people on the streets than I saw homed people… I worry about their fate, a group already likely to be more prone to sickness and with nowhere to go to keep clean.

So here are some doors from my exercise dog walk:

Green gates, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Green gates, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Pink door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Pink door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Two doors and a tiled entrance, Cheltenham Road, Bristol, March 2020
Two doors and a tiled entrance, Cheltenham Road, Bristol, March 2020
Garden gate, Ashley Road, Bristol, March 2020
Garden gate, Ashley Road, Bristol, March 2020
Solicitor's door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2020
Solicitor’s door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2020

 

Well that’s it for this extraordinary week during an extraordinary period in all our lives.

If you have made it this far, you probably like doors and you ought to take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

by Scooj

Thursday doors – 19 March 2020

Doors 98 – a couple of Bristol doors

It has been almost exactly a month since I last posted a Thursday doors entry on Natural Adventures. It has been busy at work lately and I have felt the squeeze a little.

These are two doors I recently photographed. Neither of them particulsrly attractive, but they more than make up for it in Character.

The first door is on the side of the amazing Mickleburgh musical instruments shop in Stokes Croft – we actually bought our piano there and it is an incredible place, almost Dickensian in its demeanour.

Where is the chicken? Flat door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2020
Where is the chicken? Flat door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2020

The door has been tagged, bombed and slapped (with stickers). I can make out a tag by 2HOT and a slap from Ryder. I’m not too sure who the face and ‘ou est le poulet’ is by but the whole thing adds up to a cornucopia of street graffiti so commonj in this area.

Restaurant kitchen door, off Park Street, Bristol, March 2020
Restaurant kitchen door, off Park Street, Bristol, March 2020

The second door is a little different and looks like it has seen a whole ton of action over the years. Much used but not much loved. It appears to have a thick layer of grease or something dripped on it, but the thing that really makes stand out for me is the extractor fan… the door would not be complete without it.

More doors coming soon.

If you have made it this far, you probably like doors and you ought to take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

2670. Stokes Croft

I think that this is the last qWeRT pasteup of our googly-eyed friend that I managed to find after a visit to Bristol by the artist a few weeks ago. This yellow love-heart character was pasted on a wall that sees quite a lot of tagging action, and not long after I took this picture the wheatpase became quite badly tagged, which is a pity.

qWeRT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, December 2019
qWeRT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, December 2019

There is something rather special about qWeRT’s wheatpastes, and it seems that all of them carry messages of love and hope and who can complain about that? Unlike spray paint, paste ups eventually get wet and peel away, a process that can take a few weeks in exposed places to a few years if they are more sheltered. This one I fear may not last too long.