1498. Stokes Croft Corner wall (6)

As you drive towards Stokes Croft from The Bearpit roundabout you see, from quite a distance, this iconic wall with its rather old-looking Stinkfish piece on it. The bottom of the wall below the yellow and black portrait tends to be in relatively constant flux.

Mr Sleven, Stokes Croft, Bristol, May 2018
Mr Sleven, Stokes Croft, Bristol, May 2018

I am not sure who sprayed the Stokes Croft writing, but I have a hunch that it might have been Sesk. There are a whole bunch of graffiti writers in Bristol capable of creating this work. The characters on the left hand side of the piece are by Mr Sleven and represent members of the community some might recognise. They are holding up a banner “Make Bristol shit again, got drugs?” but I am not too sure what point Mr Sleven is trying to make.

Mr Sleven, Stokes Croft, Bristol, May 2018
Mr Sleven, Stokes Croft, Bristol, May 2018

The characters themselves are nicely done, and I am particularly drawn to how he has incorporated their eyes. The wall is now bright and colourful once again, but now I think it is the turn of the upper part of this wall to get a special makeover.

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Thursday doors

Door(s) 33

This week, following on from a recent post in my graffiti/street art category, I decided to dig out some pictures of doors in Moon Street, one of my favourite haunts. All of the doors have been painted on, some of them several times over.

Moon Street is a short road that runs parallel with Stokes Croft and has mixed building use from a company car park, derelict church building, light industrial units through to a couple of night clubs a pub and a derelict plot.

This rather neglected area is perfect for street artists to display their talents, and doors lend themselves to being sprayed, it might be something to do with the framing and proportions.

Enjoy the gallery.

Door, Moon Street, Ryder
Door, Moon Street, Ryder
Rezwonk, Moon Street, Bristol, October 2017
Rezwonk, Moon Street, Bristol, October 2017
Sled One and Smak, Moon Street, Bristol, April 2016
Sled One and Smak, Moon Street, Bristol, April 2016
Laic 217, Moon Street, Bristol, May 2017
Laic 217, Moon Street, Bristol, May 2017
Coloquix, Moon Street, Bristol, August 2016
Coloquix, Moon Street, Bristol, August 2016
Laic217, Moon Street, Bristol, February 2017
Laic217, Moon Street, Bristol, February 2017
NEVERGIVEUP, Moon Street, Bristol, April 2018
NEVERGIVEUP, Moon Street, Bristol, April 2018
Rezwonk, Moon Street, Bristol, July 2017
Rezwonk, Moon Street, Bristol, July 2017
Rezwonk, Moon Street, Bristol, April 2018
Rezwonk, Moon Street, Bristol, April 2018
Rezwonk, Moon Street, Bristol, April 2018
Rezwonk, Moon Street, Bristol, April 2018

by Scooj

More doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

1492. Stokes Croft, the Carriageworks (37)

I have been posting about the work of Face 1st for a long time now, and he really is one of my favourite artists in Bristol. His simple formula of combining the word FACE with a face incorporated never ceases to impress me. I have also noticed that he has started to become active on Instagram, which will help me to keep on top of his work and maybe find out a little bit more about him.

Face 1st, The Carriageworks, Bristol, April 2018
Face 1st, The Carriageworks, Bristol, April 2018

This piece on the Carriageworks in Stokes Croft is from a little while ago, but is one of the last few to be sprayed on this building which is now fenced off as the long awaited (decades) development work on the site has begun. The site was a bit grotty, but part of the character of the area will be lost forever once the graffiti and street art are no longer incorporated. Gentrification is gaining pace in the area.

Since I started wrioting posts about Face 1st, I have been calling him Face F1st…uit is a difficult thing to do once you have a habit, but I will from no on refer to him as Face 1st (which will bugger up my archive searches a little but there you go).

Thursday doors

Door 32

Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol
Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol

This week I am bringing things back down to earth with a resounding thud…can you hear it? THUD. From the glorious lobby doors in Barcelona last week to two doors in Stokes Croft, Bristol, which couldn’t be further removed from their Spanish cousins.

Graffiti and tagging is rife in this particular spot, and there is scarcely a square inch of wood or wall that has not been scrawled on. In one sense, it is what brings a unique character to this small, but ferociously independent area of the city, but in another sense, it also highlights social, political and cultural unrest combined with urban poverty.

Colourful as it may seem, I don’t think I’d like to live behind this door, or the one below for that matter, but some people do live there and have to put up with the disrespect shown to their property.

Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol
Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol

So something less beautiful and unsettling this week…all part of Thursday doors.

by Scooj

More doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

1428. Stokes Croft

Right next door to the huge Alex Lucas mural in Stokes Croft is this interesting recent shutter piece by Object… . This is a commission piece from TLD cycles and helps us to understand the boundaries between commissions and free street art.

Object..., Stokes Croft, Bristol, April 2018
Object…, Stokes Croft, Bristol, April 2018

Object… is no stranger to this blog, and much of his work is highly political and outspoken. He is also an artist who needs to make money, just like the rest of us, and producing work like this is how he does it. What I really like about this piece is that is is a really nice rendition of a bicycle gear block which carries the strong signature stule of the artist. The shop could easily have commissioned some sterile corporate artwork, but instead chose a local artist. The shopfront as a result really fits in with the area.

1423. Stokes Croft, the Carriageworks (37)

You can’t turn your back for one minute in Stokes Croft. If you do, you run the risk of missing out on a clean piece of artwork. This wonderful surreal piece by Tom Miller had only been up a day or two before being tagged over. I find it strange that the perpetraters respected the work enough to tag the black surround, but left the central part largely untouched. Either respect the piece or don’t, but this faux politeness is a joke.

Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2018
Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2018

Once again Tom Miller challenges our conventional world with a burst of colour and a figure whose head appears to be exploding off its body. I think that Miller has an unbelievable talent and extraordinary imagination. Best of all, I like it that he uses the streets as a gallery so that Bristol citizens have free access to his talents.

Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2018
Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2018

Although his subject matter might not be to everyone’s taste, it is clear that we are witnessing the emergence and development of a very special talent.

1422. Stokes Croft, No111 (2)

Shutter pieces are always difficult to photograph, and I understand they are a devil to paint too. There is always quite a lot of glare from the curves on each panel of the shutter, and they are usually best seen with the naked eye which somehow accommodated for the glare and gives you a better image.

Kin Dose, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2018
Kin Dose, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2018

The chimp here is a beautiful creation by the versatile Kin Dose. He had a piece on this exact same shutter before, but it had recently been vandalised. I am a big fan of his work, and he produces it infrequently enough to always make you want more.

Kin Dose, Stokes Croft, Bristol, September 2016
Kin Dose, Stokes Croft, Bristol, September 2016