2508. Stokes Croft

In the last six months or so, I don’t recall seeing very much work by Ryder. It might be that I just haven’t been at the right place at the right time, it sometimes goes like that.

Ryder, Stokes Croft, Bristol, September 2019
Ryder, Stokes Croft, Bristol, September 2019

This shutter piece is in Stokes Croft and although I have passed it many times, I haven’t had the presence of mind to photograph it until recently. I think it has probably seen better days, but represents beautifully the graffiti scene in this little stretch of road. One of the upsides to painting a shutter (and there can’t be many) is that horizontal lines are easy to paint and the colour shifts in this piece are neatly done by following the lines on the shutter. Ryder rarely disappoints.

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2507. St George skate park (8)

It is a great pity that I didn’t manage to photograph this piece by Slakarts before it got scuffed up (an occupational hazard for any paintings in a well-used skate park), because it is difficult to make out the true beauty of it. Although I have a few of his pieces in my archives, this is only the second of his pieces that I have written about. Probably about time to break some of his older pieces out.

Slakarts, St George, Bristol, September 2019
Slakarts, St George, Bristol, September 2019

His work often features a face in this style that rather resembles a mask. The subtle colours he has used here are probably more prone to skateboard damage than something that might have been a bit brighter but you can nonetheless get a sense of the rather solemn face. The drips are intentional. More to come from Slakarts soon.

2506. Leonard Lane (21)

Leonard Lane remains one of my favourite secrets in Bristol. Completely off the radar of most of my fellow citizens, this little lane plays host to a diverse and interesting range of graffiti and street art. One of the more recent additions is this fabulous little sculpture by relative newcomer Mutatee.

Mutatee, Leonard Lane, Bristol, September 2019
Mutatee, Leonard Lane, Bristol, September 2019

I don’t know too much just yet about Mutatee, but it is great to have an artist in Bristol working in a different medium from spray paint or paste ups, carefully placing these little gems for the curious to discover. I have seen a few of her pieces dotted around, but this is the first I have posted on Natural Adventures. It is pieces like these that are so rewarding for the observant, those whose eyes are peeled and who look at the world around them living in the moment. Thank you Mutatee for maki;g my day when I found this.

2505. M32 Cycle path (34)

Here we have yet another outstanding example of fabulous writing from Decay whose pieces have been an absolute highlight in Bristol this year and my goodness, there have been a great many of them – Check some of them out in this gallery.

Decay, M32 cycle path, Bristol, October 2019
Decay, M32 cycle path, Bristol, October 2019

In this one Decay has gone for his customary letter shapes, but the fill has a kind of smokey atmospheric feel to it, and the white accents give it a wonderful 3D effect. As always, his little character ‘Chuck’ makes up the letter E in the word DECAY. A lovely piece of writing.

2504. St Mark’s Avenue (3)

In my favourite recently discovered spot, St Mark’s Avenue in Easton, is this great collaboration between Soap and Zake which I had seen previously on Instagram, but never knew where it was. Well now I know.

Zake, St Mark's Avenue, Bristol, September 2019
Zake, St Mark’s Avenue, Bristol, September 2019

On the left is a portrait by Zake that unusually for this alleyway has been altered by some idiot, goofing the eyes and the lips This is a real shame because it gives the character a completely different and rather sinister ‘personality’ than that of the original. Even though it has been altered, I felt it worth including, partly to demonstrate that not everything I get to see is in its perfect pristine state and also to explain why I try to get out regularly to find new pieces before they have been tagged or ruined.

Soap, St Mark's Avenue, Bristol, September 2019
Soap, St Mark’s Avenue, Bristol, September 2019

On the right is some colourful and uplifting writing fro Soap. The photograph is a little bit rubbish, partly because of the rather unhelpful wheelie bin and also because of the width of the lane at this point is quite tight and ‘front on’ pictures are an impossibility without a wide angle lens. Unlike much of the work in this lane it is relatively recent and was painted this year. As an aside, the tag on the bin is one that can be found pretty much everywhere in Bristol – I don’t know the tagger’s name, but it is probably concealed somewhere within the tag.

2503. St Werburghs tunnel (101)

Possibly this piece needs no introduction because the artist features in Natural Adventures rather a lot although this one is a little more cryptic than some of his other works. It is of course by Rezwonk and spells out REZER.

Rezwonk, St Werburghs, Bristol, October 2019
Rezwonk, St Werburghs, Bristol, October 2019

Because of the light conditions in the tunnel, this photograph really doesn’t do the piece justice at all and the colours have been somewhat bleached out. This is highly accomplished and complex writing with so many elements crossing over between letters in what looks like a rather haphazard way and yet perfectly creating great letters. When I see complex work like this, I just scratch my head and wonder how on Earth he does it. Great skills.

2502. M32 Cycle path (34)

It is a great feeling discovering an artist who is relatively new to the Bristol scene and finding their pieces dotted about the place. One such artist is Lobe and I get a little ping of excitement each time I find one of her stylised portraits, a feeling I get each time I find a piece by Laic217 – some artists have this effect on me more than others.

Lobe, M32 Cycle path, Bristol, October 2019
Lobe, M32 Cycle path, Bristol, October 2019

This piece looks like it is a tribute piece to Wayne. Such works often have a little touch of sadness about them, but that is ok, it is a fair reflection of life in general. Once again her bold colours and shadings demonstrate her distinctive style which is just as well as I have yet to see a signed piece by her. All good.