1249. Moon Street (40)

This is the second of two pieces by Rezwonk in Moon Street and one which on first glance looks like a simple geometric pattern scrawled on a gate. Looking more closely, there is probably more to it.

Rezwonk, Moon Street, Bristol, October 2017
Rezwonk, Moon Street, Bristol, October 2017

The patterns are composed of five lines, always in the same order, a little bit like holding five biros in your hand and making patterns or letters  – the kind of things you did at school. Another layer of sophistication here is that the lines are contained within a circle although the circle isn’t outlined. I am not certain, but I wonder if the patterns are letters…if they are, I can’t work them out. My favourite touch though is the five bar gate at the bottom right, almost like a checklist that the five colours have all made it onto the piece. A lovely abstract piece.

Rezwonk, Moon Street, Bristol, July 2017
Rezwonk, Moon Street, Bristol, July 2017

 

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1248. The Bearpit (115)

This is a lesson in always making sure you get a photograph of a new piece when you can, even if the photograph is compromised by poor light conditions or weather of street furniture etc. If you don’t snap it up straight away, then the next time you see it it may be tagged.

Laic217, The Bearpit, Bristol, October 2017
Laic217, The Bearpit, Bristol, October 2017

This piece by Laic217 appeared in The Bearpit in October after something of a quiet period in his street work. I managed to photograph it, but the morning sun was casting a shadow across the wall. I figured I would return to get a ‘clean’ picture. The next time I visited however the smiley face had been tagged, albeit rather tastefully, with a tribute. Annoying as it might seem, this is all part of the street/graffiti art scene.

Laic217, The Bearpit, Bristol, October 2017
Laic217, The Bearpit, Bristol, October 2017

As always I like this work from Laic217, and hope he keeps it up. I have been enjoying the incredible progress he has made in the time that I have been doing this and get pleasure from seeing the direction his work goes in.

1247. Rivington Street, New York (1)

This large and impressive wall in Rivington Street is by KaNO. Such a magnificent cartoon character in a very distinctive style, it should come as no surprise that KaNO freelances as a character designer for such studios as Warner Bros, Cartoon Network, and Hasbro.

Kano, Rivington Street, New York, October 2017
Kano, Rivington Street, New York, October 2017

KaNO was born and raised on the streets of New York and was influenced by cartoon characters on the TV. He then went on to study art and design and animation. His full biography can be found on his website, along with some fabulous galleries of studio and street art.

Kano, Rivington Street, New York, October 2017
Kano, Rivington Street, New York, October 2017

This really is a wonderful piece from a greatly talented artist.

1246. Broom Street, New York (3)

This is another stunner from Tristan Eaton entitled Big City of Dreams which rises high above a car park, you know, one of those funny little ones in New York that must charge the most extortionate fees, and stack cars in a way we are not accustomed to seeing in the UK.

Tristan Eaton, Broome Street, New York, October 2017
Tristan Eaton, Broome Street, New York, October 2017

Tristan Eaton reminds me of an amalgamation of different styles that has elements of PichiAvo and Louis Masai about it, which is of course a great compliment. I think that his work is exceptional and love the piece I posted before of his Audrey Hepburn in SoHo.

Tristan Eaton, Broome Street, New York, October 2017
Tristan Eaton, Broome Street, New York, October 2017

1245. Broome Street, New York (2)

I still have a great many pictures from my trip to New York in October 2017, but have had some difficulty finding the names of artists, and the locations of some of the pieces. These difficulties act as a bit of a barrier to writing these posts, as I have limited time to do the research required. The emergence of Street Art Cities, a website and app, has been an absolute godsend in that respect. Street Art Cities allows local street art ‘hunters’ (people like me) to upload street and graffiti art onto a map-based platform with descriptions of the work. I am one of two such approved hunters in Bristol, and in New York, a recent upload extravaganza by the four hunters there is making my job of posting my holiday snaps so much easier. Maybe if they ever visit Bristol they will benefit from the work I have done for Street Art Cities.

John Matos, Bower Street, New York, October 2017
John Matos, Bower Street, New York, October 2017

 

Now I can tell you that this stunning piece of Yosemite Sam in Broome Street is by John ‘Crash Matos’, an artist brought up in the Bronx in the 1960s and 70s. He tends to feature a cartoon character combined with the word CRASH in many of his pieces, a long way from bombing trains in train yards as a teenager. His nickname ‘Crash’ was coined after he accidentally crashed a computer in school…something that was much easier to do back in the old days I can assure you. This is a brilliant piece from a brilliant artist.

Thursday doors

Door 15

Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol
Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol

I love this door which I walk past most days on my way to work. It is not so much the door, but the door frame that attracts me. It has that ‘distressed’ look. Many years worth of different colour paints have been roughly exposed, intentionally I think, to produce this colour burst and polite nod to the passing of time.

Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol
Door, Stokes Croft, Bristol

Thursday doors has given me the platform to talk about this lovely door.

 

by Scooj

 

Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

1240. Lower Approach Road (6)

This is a part of a slightly curious collaboration mural down behind Temple Meads station, accessed via Lower Approach Road. On the day that I went to photograph the mural, I couldn’t actually get to all of it because there was some construction work barricading off the left hand side. This was a bit annoying and rather took the edge off the whole experience.

Silent Hobo, Lower Approach Road, Bristol, November 2017
Silent Hobo, Lower Approach Road, Bristol, November 2017

This section is by Silent Hobo whose contemporary figures I never tire of. There is a whole big story going on here – a dystopian future scene? The girl is not only plugged in to her headset, but also into the ground. She is lying on top of an urban sprawl while a couple of falorn skeleton/robots can be seen in the distance. Then there are the goldfish…

Silent Hobo, Lower Approach Road, Bristol, November 2017
Silent Hobo, Lower Approach Road, Bristol, November 2017

The other character seems to be having some kind of meltdown. His skin is starting to resemble a circuit board, and he is being swallowed up by his urban environment. Perhaps he is transitioning into a soulless robot. Maybe I should ask the artist what this is all about the next time I see him.