Thursday doors

Door 29

I usually like to present one door at a time in my Thursday doors posts to allow for a thorough examination of the door, without the distractions of others. However, sometimes it is appropriate to look at several at once – besides which, how else will I be able to clear out my archive of doors?

On a recent trip to Barcelona with my daughter, I noticed that in the old city many of the doors to apartments above shops were extraordinarily thin and tall. Some were so slender that you wonder how larger people might manage. Were they designed this way to maximise the space for the shop front? or was there some other reason for this architectural design? Answers on a postcard…

Here are a few of the many doors we saw:

Barcelona door, March 2018
Barcelona door, March 2018
Barcelona door, March 2018
Barcelona door, March 2018

 

Barcelona door, March 2018
Barcelona door, March 2018

This door was open, and what I saw inside was not at all what I expected. This is not a place for those afraid of confined spaces. Immediately behind the door, there was a stone spiral stairtcase, tighter than any I have ever seen before. By the look of it on the doorbell, there are eight apartments through this door. The mind boggles at the logistics of meeting people travelling in opposite directions, and looking at this through the lens of the British pre-occupation of health and safety – isn’t this something of a horrific fire escape risk? Interesting as it is, I fret every time I look at this picture.

Barcelona door, March 2018
Barcelona door, March 2018

by Scooj

More doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0

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1437. The Bearpit (133)

I believe this to be the best piece I have seen this year, and one of the best that the artist, Tom Miller, has produced to date. This classy work was painted for a Spring paint jam on 14 April 2018 and dominates all around it.

Tom Miller, The Bearpit, Bristol, April 2018
Tom Miller, The Bearpit, Bristol, April 2018

This most most eye-catching and vibrant of pieces, illuminates the tunnel and brings a touch of fine art to the people who pass through it. So typical of Miller’s work, there is a face, disfigured and distorted by colour stretching out of it. A scene of serenity and torture compressed into one space. His surreal and dream-like pieces never cease to amaze me, but this one really trumps the rest.

Tom Miller, The Bearpit, Bristol, April 2018
Tom Miller, The Bearpit, Bristol, April 2018

Tom Miller has been busy this Spring, a trend which I hope spans into the summer and beyond. This piece is so good.

1436. Tropicana, Weston-super-Mare (8)

I haven’t posted much from JPS for a long while, because I haven’t seen any of his recent work, and he doesn’t seem to come to Bristol as much as he used to. I owe my interest in street art to this artist thanks to a small piece near my work in Frogmore Street which he had just restored.

JPS, the Tropicana, Weston-super-Mare, August 2016
JPS, the Tropicana, Weston-super-Mare, August 2016

This old one in the Tropicana entrance area is a multi-layered stencil of Cain from Robocop. It showcases just how brilliant JPS is at creating these large highly detailed stencils. The broom next to it gives an indication of scale. I am in love with this man’s work.

1435. Tropicana, Weston-super-Mare (7)

Going back a little while to the summer of 2016, I managed to find a few moments to hunt down some street art while on a day trip to Weston-super-Mare with the family. I spent a little time in the Tropicana and snapped this nice work by Nol and Edo Rath who paint together as Noodle inc.

Nol and Edo Rath, the Tropicana, Weston-super-Mare, August 2016
Nol and Edo Rath, the Tropicana, Weston-super-Mare, August 2016

The bold colours, clean lines and humorous monsters are typical of their work, which shares some similarities with Buff Monster. After taking this picture, I have since become more familiar with their work and with Nol in particular through Upfest. Always a pleasure to see their creations.

1434. Raleigh Road, Tobacco Factory (11)

I’m not too sure when Gregos came to Bristol, but I have a feeling it might have been for Upfest 2015. There are only one or two of his face masks that remain in the city. I took this picture in 2016, and to be honest I’ve not checked to see if it is still there.

Gregos, Raleigh Road, Bristol, July 2016
Gregos, Raleigh Road, Bristol, July 2016

His masks adorn walls all around Europe and beyond, and it is always a pleasure to come across one. These haunting masks retain so much detail from the original mould and you can see wrinkles and eyelashes. His expressions vary from mask to mask, and with all installation artists location is critical. Gregos is the king of this style of street art.