4403. Greenbank (40)

Billy continues to utterly delight with her uncomplicated storytelling pieces. Her work is so accessible and has a deep connection with the viewer, and I imagine especially so with younger audiences. There is nothing pretentious or conceited about her work, it is full of fun and commentary that is pleasing to the eye and great for lifting the spirit.

Billy, Greenbank, Bristol, March 2022
Billy, Greenbank, Bristol, March 2022

I particularly like this piece, I mean what’s not to like about dogs, birds, hats, flowers, a pencil and a lava lamp. I think that the grey background works really well with the overall presentation and the colour scheme is superb. A feast for the eyes and a triumph for Billy – one of my favourite pieces of hers so far.

4314. Dean Lane skate park (474)

This was something of a red-letter day for me, turning up at Dean Lane to find Mudra painting alongside Kosc and Flava136 (who has now changed his moniker to Saor). Unfortunately, Flava136’s piece had been painted over by the time I returned to get pictures of the completed works, but Mudra and Kosc’s were intact.

Mudra, Dean Lane, Bristol, February 2022
Mudra, Dean Lane, Bristol, February 2022

Mudra is an artist who, although he has only been painting in Bristol for a couple of years, has firmly established himself in the city and is definitely going from strength to strength. With each of his pieces, his confidence and dynamism grows, and I am thoroughly enjoying the ride.

Mudra, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2022
Mudra, Dean Lane, Bristol, March 2022

This is a curious piece that, for once, doesn’t spell out Mudra, but instead incorporates the letters NTS, a crew name (I don’t yet know what it stands for). There is a typically stylised Mudra face with a giveaway coloured nose and for some utterly unknown reason a bird perching at a bird box. Great to see and great fun.

4263. Dean Lane skate park (465)

Well, blow me down with a feather. This lovely piece of writing from Xenz came as a complete unannounced surprise in Dean Lane, and is all the better for it. Finding a street art piece that you don’t know is there is like a palaeontologist uncovering a fossil never seen before, or something like that at least.

Xenz, Dean Lane, Bristol, February 2022
Xenz, Dean Lane, Bristol, February 2022

The piece spells out XENZ in a rock-like appearance with vines draped above and on the letters. The highlight, as is often the case with Xenz’s work, is the careful placement of little birds perching on the vines. Although we don’t get to see Xenz very frequently in Bristol, it is always noteworthy when he paints here. Fine work.

4084. M32 roundabout J3 (363)

Another fine piece that has been in The Natural Adventures ‘departure lounge’ for an eternity is this lovely bird by Aspire, reminding us of what we have missed since he moved to London a few years back.

Aspire, M32 roundabout, Bristol, June 2016
Aspire, M32 roundabout, Bristol, June 2016

Painted as part of a paint jam, you will notice a Kid Crayon character just to the right… what heady days those were. Pieces would stay intact for much longer back then. These days if you snooze you lose. I have had trouble identifying the blue and white bird, which troubles me as I consider myself quite good at identifying wildlife. It is beautifully painted with Aspire’s signature pixelated boxes. It was a sad day indeed, when he left Bristol.

3929. Upfest 2021 75×75 (58)

Curtis Hylton is a superstar, and this mural confirms his status as a worldie and no mistake. He has been to Bristol a few times in recent years, both for Upfest events and for painting with his mates, he has also painted at the Cheltenham Paint Festival where a couple of his works are still on show.

Curtis Hylton, Chessel Street, Bristol, August 2021, Upfest 21
Curtis Hylton, Chessel Street, Bristol, August 2021, Upfest 21

This piece, tucked away in one of the residential streets in Bedminster, is simply stunning. The owners of this property have been blessed with a magnificent piece of artwork to call their own and share with their local community.

Curtis Hylton, Chessel Street, Bristol, August 2021, Upfest 21
Curtis Hylton, Chessel Street, Bristol, August 2021, Upfest 21

The mural features a little boy in a yellow raincoat feeding a collection of yellow birds that are partially composed of flowers – a theme that lies at the heart of Curtis Hylton pieces. This combination of petals and feathers is so effective and creates a wonderful connection with nature.

Curtis Hylton, Chessel Street, Bristol, August 2021, Upfest 21
Curtis Hylton, Chessel Street, Bristol, August 2021, Upfest 21

Next to the front door is a cheeky little robin painted in slightly more russet tones, but well-matched with the rest of the piece. This photograph will undoubtedly be making an appearance in Thursday Doors sometime in the future – a fairly ordinary door enhanced by its surroundings.

Curtis Hylton, Chessel Street, Bristol, August 2021, Upfest 21
Curtis Hylton, Chessel Street, Bristol, August 2021, Upfest 21

To the right of the piece is a beautiful finch with its wings spread out wide and its chest revealing a couple of roses and a magnolia flower. Amazing. This is a ‘must-visit’ mural from Upfest’s 75 walls in 75 years event, and I hope that it remains well beyond the usual one-year life cycle for these things.

Curtis Hylton, Chessel Street, Bristol, August 2021, Upfest 21
Curtis Hylton, Chessel Street, Bristol, August 2021, Upfest 21

All of this activity and the little boy watches on.

3862. Chessel Street

I think that one of the spin-off benefits of the Upfest 2021 75×75 event has been that I have spent a whole lot more time in Bedminster this summer than I normally would, and in doing so have come across a few gems, like this one by Andy Council, that I might not have ordinarily seen.

Andy Council, Chessel Street, Bristol, July 2021
Andy Council, Chessel Street, Bristol, July 2021

This piece, which I assume is a commission, features a robin red-breast made up of multiple components stitched together with pink cord. This stitching theme is one that Andy Council has been working on a lot over the past couple of years and seems to have superseded his architectural blocks for which he is most famous. The sketch of this piece on his Instagram feed has a slightly better proportioned neck on the Robin, but I am perhaps being a bit picky. A wonderful little piece.