Old sly

 

Planting out on the

allotment being watched; I

turn, he slinks away.

 

by Scooj

Advertisements

284. Dean Lane skate park (10)

This is a quick fun piece by Eraze sprayed in early June. I like the work and would like to see more of his creations. It is the first Eraze work I have seen as a picture only, without the security blanket of writing, although I am sure there are others.

Eraze, Dean Lane skate park, Bristol, May 2016
Eraze, Dean Lane skate park, Bristol, May 2016

The progression can be seen from the piece I featured back in May nearby, although it carries the same ‘dope’ feature.

Eraze, Dean Lane skate park, Bristol, May 2016
Eraze, Dean Lane skate park, Bristol, May 2016

I am enjoying finding work by Eraze, and know that If I visit Dean Lane skate park often enough I will see more of his stuff. His choice of name is interesting – if you search Google for ‘Eraze graffiti’ you get loads of graffiti removal websites. Ironic?

283. The Bearpit (21)

In Bristol, most of the political street art seems to be created by stencil specialists. I guess the technique lends itself to writing messages and combining them with famous, iconic or striking figures.

Dice 67, The Bearpit, Bristol, June 2016
Dice 67, The Bearpit, Bristol, June 2016

In this beautifully executed example by Dice 67, we see a homeless man holding up a banner, while behind him there is a group of Tory politicians, in what appears to be a police line up. The Prime Minister is accompanied by Gove, Hunt, Osborne and one other. The Tory manufactured mantra since the coalition has been ‘we’re all in it together’. Obviously it is not the case, as the wealthy continue to get wealthier and the poorest in our communities are dropping through the cracks.

Dice 67, The Bearpit, Bristol, June 2016
Dice 67, The Bearpit, Bristol, June 2016

Whether I agree or not with this piece is irrelevant in so much as it is a fantastic work and worthy of greater exposure. Dice 67 is a brilliant stencil artist, and I always love it when he visits Bristol and leaves something like this behind.

Dice 67, The Bearpit, Bristol, June 2016
Dice 67, The Bearpit, Bristol, June 2016

He signs off the piece with his usual spray cans. A great work.

282. Hill Street

There is a good story to this piece. Some time before I started to blog about street art, and around about the time that I really started to get interested, I saw two artists working together on a small car park wall on Hill Street, parallel with Park Street. I surreptitiously took a couple of pictures and walked on. Since that time, I have returned to the wall many times and taken other pictures.

Fois, Hill Street, Bristol, April 2015
Fois, Hill Street, Bristol, April 2015

I am not sure who one of the artists was, and so his wall does not feature here, but the other was Fois. At the time, and for a long time afterwards, I didn’t know it was by Fois, but it became very clear when I wrote about his piece on Nine Tree Hill.

Fois, Hill Street, Bristol, November 2015
Fois, Hill Street, Bristol, November 2015

It is a wonderful work, spelling out his name with the characteristic colours and curves that have, to my mind at least, a strong feel of the 1930s. I will at some point find out who his collaborator on the day was, but it might be some time.

Fois, Hill Street, Bristol, April 2015
Fois, Hill Street, Bristol, April 2015

281. Muller Road

This mural is deep in Zase country. Many of his works are on show in the neighbourhood, and recently this commission for the local veterinary practice has brightened up an otherwise drab wall. I suspect that business may have improved too.

Zase, Muller Road, Bristol, April 2016
Zase, Muller Road, Bristol, April 2016

These animals are beautifully painted, which is what we have come to expect from Zase designs. The animals are incredibly realistic, but seem to have a slightly cheeky cartoonish character about them. This is an artist at the top of his game.

Zase, Muller Road, Bristol, April 2016
Zase, Muller Road, Bristol, April 2016

He has also painted one of his trademark wildstyle burners, but I am unable to decipher it. He has dotted the whole piece with the words ‘love’, ‘compassion’ and ‘care’. All in all it is a wonderful community piece, and a local landmark.

Zase, Muller Road, Bristol, April 2016
Zase, Muller Road, Bristol, April 2016

 

 

280. M32 Roundabout J3 (12)

Voyder is an artist and wildstyle graffiti writer who I think is Bristol based, and often collaborates with Deamze and Soker. His website reveals little about him, but showcases his artwork beautifully. Known for his writing and art pieces in equal measure he has a strong presence in Bristol, and is a member of ASK.

Voyder, M32 roundabout, Bristol, March 2016
Voyder, M32 roundabout, Bristol, March 2016

His writing is distinctive in that it is usually in thin script, rather than the cryptic block style other Bristol artists use, and on a slant, much more like a handwritten signature. His work really stands out from the crowd, because of its distinctive style. I have a whole load more of his work stacking up and waiting to write about. We are very lucky in Bristol to have so many talented wildstyle writers, and walls for them to spray.