4079. Alexandra Parade (2), Weston-super-Mare

I have never made any secret of the fact that I love the work of JPS and that he is without question in my top five favourite street artists, although I don’t know who the other four would be. For this reason, it is always a pleasure to visit Weston-super-Mare, his original hometown, where so many of his stencil pieces adorn the town’s walls.

JPS, Alexandra Parade, Weston-super-Mare, September 2021
JPS, Alexandra Parade, Weston-super-Mare, September 2021

This is quite an old piece, but one that I have always admired. I took this picture on my recent visit, but I think I have a pictures from some time ago that just never got published on this blog. Shame on me, although my heightened sense of self-doubt wonders whether this might be a repeat of a stencil he painted elsewhere.

JPS, Alexandra Parade, Weston-super-Mare, September 2021
JPS, Alexandra Parade, Weston-super-Mare, September 2021

This innocent-looking piece is a potent reminder of the fragility of planet Earth, but one that also transports us back to both our own childhoods but also to an era of innocence that is now long since gone. These retro scenes are always beautifully presented and executed and demonstrate why JPS is held in such high regard.

Cheese-cutter

.

Nestled side by side

cocooned in spikey armour

prepared for battle

.

by Scooj

  • Although no longer permitted in the schoolyard, the game of conkers was one of those things that we simply grew up with. The excitement of collecting shiny new conkers and breaking them free from their shells was one of autumn’s pure joys. A cheese-cutter was a flattened conker that had shared its outer shell with another and were thought to bestow an advantage by cracking open your opponent’s conker using the sharp flat edge. such happy days. I still find new conkers irresistible and still come home with pocketfuls of them.

2712. M32 roundabout J3 (192)

I am beginning to form the opinion that EAT crew are becoming something of a collaborative force in Bristol. EAT are of course SPZero76 and Kid Crayon and the pairing, whose styles are light years apart, seem to be able to create great work together like these two characters playing conkers (remember that?).

SPZero76, M32 roundabout, Bristol, January 2020
SPZero76, M32 roundabout, Bristol, January 2020

SPZero76 is an extraordinary character artist and has an amazing ability to create an insane amount of detail in his pieces, and his style is quite sharp and pointy, if that makes any sense at all.

Kid Crayon, M32 roundabout, Bristol, January 2020
Kid Crayon, M32 roundabout, Bristol, January 2020

On the other hand, Kid Crayon has a much softer style with plenty of curves and roundness about it. Stitch the two together and you have a complementary mix that somehow works very well indeed, better than you might expect.

SPZero76 and Kid Crayon, M32 roundabout, Bristol, January 2020
SPZero76 and Kid Crayon, M32 roundabout, Bristol, January 2020

Kid Crayon, in particular has been very busy this year already, and that is music to my eyes, because he pretty much tops my list of Bristol artists and I have been enjoying watching him grow as an artist over the last six years or so.

SPZero76 and Kid Crayon, M32 roundabout, Bristol, January 2020
SPZero76 and Kid Crayon, M32 roundabout, Bristol, January 2020

In addition to the fabulous collaboration, these two have signed the piece by commandeering a waste bin and leaving two little self-portraits. Creative, imaginative and fun. Looking forward to seeing more eat collabs in 2020.

Kid Crayon and SPZero, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2017
Kid Crayon and SPZero, Dean Lane, Bristol, June 2017