Thursday doors – 22 August

Doors 81 – Lanhydrock House (1)

Last weekend I was lucky enough to visit a National Trust property in Cornwall, south of Bodmin Moor, called Lanhydrock House. Built out of hard wearing granite, the older parts of the house date back to the 1620s, but after a fire in 1881 that started in the kitchens, two of the three wings were in part destroyed and they were rebuilt and funished in the Victorial style. The remaining wing that survived the fire retains its original walls and ceilings.

The house has been owned and managed by the National Trust since 1953, before it was owned by the Robartes family which declined significantly during the first world war. The heir, Thomas Agar-Robartes MP was killed during the battle of Loos in France while trying to rescue a soldier from no-man’s land.

There were an awful lot of doors to admire in this house, so this week I will tease you by only posting the outside doors, the rest will follow in another post.

The visit begins with a stroll through the original gatehouse dating back to the mid 17th century. Did you ever see such a grand entrance?

Lanhydrock House barbican gate added in the 1640s, Cornwall, August 2019
Lanhydrock House barbican gate added in the 1640s, Cornwall, August 2019

Then off to the left are some of the outbuildings such as the coach house. The National Trust use some of these buildings for a cafe and gift shop.

Front of door to courtyard, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Front of door to courtyard, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Same door from the other side, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Same door from the other side, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

The coach house, with stunning deep red doors, is notable for the clock and little doors below it.

Coach house doors, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Coach house doors, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

It would be wrong of me not to include this most attractive door within a door.

Perfect door within a door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Perfect door within a door, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

Then to the main house itself, which had more gorgeous doors on its outside walls than I have hairs on my head (I exaggerate slightly).

One of many entrances to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
One of many entrances to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Small door to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Small door to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Larger door to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Larger door to the house, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

The front door is probably the crowning glory of these ‘garden doors’ and dates back to the 1620s. The family crest is on the top right, and the NT lady at the door told us that the crest at the top of the door has no relation to the house or family whatsoever and nobody quite knows what it is doing there.

Main front door to the house dating back to the 17th century, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019
Main front door to the house dating back to the 17th century, Lanhydrock House, Cornwall, August 2019

So there we are. More Lanhydrock doors next time.

Please go take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

Have a great end of week and weekend.

Scooj

 

229. Stokes Croft, the Carriageworks (11)

This is the second part of my marvelous Monday discovery. This is a piece by Bruno Smoky who is the husband of Shalak Attack and member of the Clandestinos Crew. I understand from his Instagram feed that Inkie was their host/guide over the weekend in Bristol, and who better to show them the best walls. I love the way the graffiti world hangs together.

Bruno Smoky, Stokes Croft, Bristol, 9 May 2016
Bruno Smoky, Stokes Croft, Bristol, 9 May 2016

This house on fire is a really breathtaking piece, and with the Shalak Attack work in the adjacent archway, the pair have really set the bar very high for the Carriageworks space. I hope the taggers stay clear and respect our visitors’ work. I like his nod to Buzz in the top left corner – respecting a little of our local thing.

Bruno Smoky, Stokes Croft, Bristol, 9 May 2016
Bruno Smoky, Stokes Croft, Bristol, 9 May 2016

Bruno Smoky grew up in Brasilandia, a neighbourhood in Sao Paolo, Brazil. He is now internationally recognised and has created works all over the world. I love this quote, lifted from his website:

“I do not neglect my roots, my greatest pleasure is to paint in communities, bringing art and culture to otherwise forgotten and precarious neighborhoods. I use Graffiti in the context of creating a space to exhibit my art to society, my themes are full of colors and forms of protest … ”

Bruno Smoky, Stokes Croft, Bristol, 9 May 2016
Bruno Smoky, Stokes Croft, Bristol, 9 May 2016

I feel genuinely privileged that they visited and painted in Bristol outside of any kind of art festival, such as Upfest.

Bruno Smoky, Stokes Croft, Bristol, 9 May 2016
Bruno Smoky, Stokes Croft, Bristol, 9 May 2016