2966. Stokes Croft

This piece from Decay was painted around the time of the introduction of lock down and was a great message for people to take the lock down restrictions seriously. Street artists have definitely played their party in broadcasting good messages during this pandemic. More recently some works are a little more critical of the government’s handling of the situation, but no surprises there.

Decay, Stokes Croft, Bristol, May 2020
Decay, Stokes Croft, Bristol, May 2020

Decay is such a consistent artist always putting out clean and tidy writing beautifully executed. There is one thing that perplexes me about this piece, and it is the eyes with wings bookending the writing. Are these the work of Decay or another artist? I think it is Decay, but it isn’t quite in his style. Answers on a postcard…

Sun, sun, sun

.

Special, sun-soaked spring

ameliorates lock down

the best on record

.

by Scooj

 

* I believe that with tomorrow’s forecast for sun, that this spring (March, April and May) will have broken all records for sunlight-hours. Thank heavens. How much more difficult the last period might have been with cold, wet weather.

Thursday doors – 28 May 2020

Doors 108 – a continuation of graffiti/street art doors

Let me open a small window into the world of Scooj during lock down. I am a civil servant and have been working full time throughout the coronavirus outbreak, indeed work has been somewhat busier than normal because of the virus and the communications work I do.

Mrs Scooj also works in the civil service, so we have both been working from home, pretty much flat-out for the last ten weeks or so. My wife drew the long straw and works in the study with our main desktop and I am working in the dining room.

Our teenage children are both at home and keeping them motivated is a real struggle and heaps a whole ton of additional pressure on all of us. Although we have has a few flare ups (inevitable in these circumstances) we have had some really good quality moments together as a family which I am sure we will all treasure. However, spare time just seems to evaporate.

All this is a bit of a long-winded way of saying that once again you are going to have to put up with archive images of doors, because although I do have some new door photographs, I can’t get anywhere near the desktop PC to prepare them for Thursday doors. So old graffiti/street art doors it is going to have to be. I hope you enjoy:

Laic217, Wilder Street, Bristol, January 2017
Laic217, Wilder Street, Bristol, January 2017

Andy Council, North Street, Bristol, January 2017
Andy Council, North Street, Bristol, January 2017

Face the Strange, Upfest, Bristol, July2016
Face the Strange, Upfest, Bristol, July2016

3Dom, John Street, Bristol, May 2016
3Dom, John Street, Bristol, May 2016

Sweet Toof, St Andrews Road, Bristol, January 2017
Sweet Toof, St Andrews Road, Bristol, January 2017

Angerami, Upfest, Bristol, July 2016
Angerami, Upfest, Bristol, July 2016

Laic217, King Square Avenue, Bristol, February 2017
Laic217, King Square Avenue, Bristol, February 2017

Jonesy, Leonard Lane, Bristol, August 2015
Jonesy, Leonard Lane, Bristol, August 2015

That’s all folks for another week. I hope you aren’t getting too tired of these urban graffiti doors. I hope I get a bit of time to share some more regular doors next week.

Take care, wherever you are.

If you have made it this far, you probably like doors and you really ought to take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

 

 

Thursday doors – 7 May 2020

Doors 105 – Zombies are coming

I am a little pressed for time this week, so here are a couple of doors I photographed over the last two days during my brief walks escaping from lock down.

I really struggle with social distancing, it feels so unnatural and uncomfortable. Crossing into the middle of the road to avoid oncoming pedestrians on the pavement  feels embarrassing, almost insulting, but I guess we all have to do it. I am lucky that it is impacts like this that have most affected me so far, they are trivial compared to the impacts on others.

The point being that my walks are not linear but rather they are zig zaggy and the upshot is I do walk to places I might not have walked before and get to see interesting things.

The first door is up some steps, that look like they could do with a bit of repair work. Not a house for people with mobility problems. The wall on the left of the steps has a great warning to us all… zombies are coming.

Steps and daisies lead up to a yellow door, Gloucester Road, Bristol, May 2020
Steps and daisies lead up to a yellow door, Gloucester Road, Bristol, May 2020

The second door isn’t really a door, it is more like a window, both physically and metaphorically. Lock down has certainly led to a surge in creativity, with gardening and baking topping the charts, but a local family (I am guessing) have made this brilliant model of a home in lock down. Take time to look at it and see what it tells you about the family. I think this is lovely and a great capture of life in the time of Coronavirus.

Behind a glass door, a scene from a lock down household, Bishopston, Bristol, May 2020
Behind a glass door, a scene from a lock down household, Bishopston, Bristol, May 2020

A wonderful interpretation of lock down life, Bishopston, Bristol, May 2020
A wonderful interpretation of lock down life, Bishopston, Bristol, May 2020

That’s it for another week. Look after yourselves.

If you have made it this far, you probably like doors and you ought to take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

2871. Turbo Island

On Turbo Island, one of the spots in Bristol that often exposes some of our greatest social problems in the city, is this wonderful message of thanks from Ryder to the National Health Service. Of course we must shout out to not only the NHS but also care home workers, all key workers, public servants and civil servants who are keeping this country ticking over during this difficult period. Notable by their absence in this list of heroes are bankers and hedge fund managers – I seem to remember the nation bailing them out about a decade ago. How quiet they are right now, speculating about how much money they can make when we come out of this crisis. Leopards never change their spots.

Ryder, Turbo Island, Bristol, April 2020
Ryder, Turbo Island, Bristol, April 2020

Ryder has managed to get out during lock down to create this piece, and I guess it could be interpreted as mental and physical exercise, and I guess he may have worn a mask when painting it. Just to emphasise the point about some of the social problems in this area, the plastic object directly in  front of the wall is a sleeping bag/tent for some poor homeless person.

Thank you Ryder for raising the spirits of Bristol citizens at this time.