3699. M32 Cycle path (127)

As mentioned previously, Lee Roy has had an exceptionally busy spring, and although he has been painting for a while he only appeared on my radar in February this year, and for every piece posted, there is at least another one in the archive.

Lee Roy, M32 Cycle path, Bristol, May 2021
Lee Roy, M32 Cycle path, Bristol, May 2021

What I like about Lee Roy is that he is constantly rethinking his work and his most recent ‘reimagining’, to use a contemporary word, has been to drape his pieces onto the ground and cascading down steps as in this example from the M32 cycle path. A great idea very nicely executed. Inevitably, there is more to come from the artist.

3186. Cheltenham 2020 (4)

One of the nice things about the Cheltenham Paint Festival is the large number of Bristol-based artists that are asked to paint. Mr Klue is a particular favourite of mine. His modest demeanour betrays his obvious talent and unique abstract style

Mr Klue, Paint Festival 2020, Cheltenham, September 2020
Mr Klue, Paint Festival 2020, Cheltenham, September 2020

I am not overjoyed at my hopeless photography. The close-up is a little too close and I have cut off the left hand edge of the piece. This is a colourful piece that probably spells out KLUE, but might not, and presents many of the trademark features we would expect to see in one of his pieces; floating steps, wisps of smoke and coiled cones give the artist away. I am rather taken with the orange ball, a nice feature.

Thursday doors – 7 May 2020

Doors 105 – Zombies are coming

I am a little pressed for time this week, so here are a couple of doors I photographed over the last two days during my brief walks escaping from lock down.

I really struggle with social distancing, it feels so unnatural and uncomfortable. Crossing into the middle of the road to avoid oncoming pedestrians on the pavement  feels embarrassing, almost insulting, but I guess we all have to do it. I am lucky that it is impacts like this that have most affected me so far, they are trivial compared to the impacts on others.

The point being that my walks are not linear but rather they are zig zaggy and the upshot is I do walk to places I might not have walked before and get to see interesting things.

The first door is up some steps, that look like they could do with a bit of repair work. Not a house for people with mobility problems. The wall on the left of the steps has a great warning to us all… zombies are coming.

Steps and daisies lead up to a yellow door, Gloucester Road, Bristol, May 2020
Steps and daisies lead up to a yellow door, Gloucester Road, Bristol, May 2020

The second door isn’t really a door, it is more like a window, both physically and metaphorically. Lock down has certainly led to a surge in creativity, with gardening and baking topping the charts, but a local family (I am guessing) have made this brilliant model of a home in lock down. Take time to look at it and see what it tells you about the family. I think this is lovely and a great capture of life in the time of Coronavirus.

Behind a glass door, a scene from a lock down household, Bishopston, Bristol, May 2020
Behind a glass door, a scene from a lock down household, Bishopston, Bristol, May 2020

A wonderful interpretation of lock down life, Bishopston, Bristol, May 2020
A wonderful interpretation of lock down life, Bishopston, Bristol, May 2020

That’s it for another week. Look after yourselves.

If you have made it this far, you probably like doors and you ought to take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

2139. Park Street (3)

There is this rather interesting crossover that occurs when a street artist paints a commission and I can never quite admire a commission as much as a piece from the heart. Maybe that is just me. On the one hand, businesses are supporting artists and paying them for their work, and this is so obviously a great thing. On the other hand, the artist paints to a brief and in some sense loses a degree of freedom. This piece, by the brilliant Silent Hobo, was commissioned by Averys – one of Bristol’s long-established wine merchants, and is actually perfect for the location.

Silent Hobo, Park Street, Bristol, March 2019
Silent Hobo, Park Street, Bristol, March 2019

Once again, we have a Bristol fox featured in a piece of local street art… note to self, I must do a ‘fox gallery’ sometime. The stairway is at the bottom of Park Street and leads directly into Frogmore Road that runs underneath. Follow the sign to Averys and you will walk past two outstanding JPS stencils and a wonderful 3Dom abstract piece. Not to mention the Banksy nearby. A little street art hotspot.