2851. Star and Garter (4)

Strictly speaking, this is not the Star and Garter but the building opposite it, but it is in the general area. This wonderful collaboration was completed shortly before the lock down and is between painting partners Sled One and Ments.

Sled One, Star and Garter, Bristol, March 2020
Sled One, Star and Garter, Bristol, March 2020

On the left is a beautifully sprayed pigeon in a style that you would instantly associate with Sled One. The bread thing going on? I’m not sure but it could be a pun on pigeon toast instead of pigeon post, but it might be something else altogether.

Sled One, Star and Garter, Bristol, March 2020
Sled One, Star and Garter, Bristol, March 2020

Sled One pieces are often quite mysterious and although there is pretty much always a story going on, understanding it can be tricky. The fabulous colours used and his technique of clever shading to create a 3D effect are of the highest quality in this piece.

Ments, Star and Garter, Bristol, March 2020
Ments, Star and Garter, Bristol, March 2020

Ments, whose work has always had an organic flavour to it, has been experimenting of late with a range of forms and textures, including spheres and metallic objects. This is a really unusual abstract piecem that looks slightly unfinished in the top left hand corner. I will be interested to watch where this new directtion for Ments will take us.

2727. Armada Place (16)

This is something of a new style being developed by Ments, and I have to say I like it and I think it has great potential. The clever combination of colours has the appearance of molten metal, but if you look up close it just looks like streaks of paint. Really clever work.

Ments, Armada Place, Bristol, January 2020
Ments, Armada Place, Bristol, January 2020

most of his work spells out MENTS, but I have to say that I struggle to see it here, but I suspect it is there somewhere. This work reminds me a bit of Fanakapan, although it is doing something different. I saw a little sneak preview of this new style in development down under Brunel Way bridge a little while back. I am so looking forward to seeing where this will lead us.

Ments, Brunel Way bridge, Bristol, January 2020
Ments, Brunel Way bridge, Bristol, January 2020

2697. At Werburghs tunnel (133)

I have been posting pieces by Ments for a few years now, and I consider him to be one of the most creative writers in Bristol. I say this because most of his work has an organic feel to it, but seldom are his pieces even remotely similar.

Ments, St Werburghs, Bristol, January 2020
Ments, St Werburghs, Bristol, January 2020

In this one, which was part of a collaborative paint with Sled One, Ments has gone with a mash up of angular spikey green shapes and metallic spheres. The overall effect is a bit peculiar and If I am honest this fusion needs a little bit more work. I can’t for the life of me see any writing resembling MENTS, but it is probably there somewhere. Great to see some early new year work from this fabulous artist.

2619. Upper York Street (19)

A stunning piece by Ments on a great wall. This whole area is being redeveloped, and I fear that the wall may have already been demolished, which is a real pity because it has hosted some really spectacular art. The reduction in available walls to paint in this area is going to be a bit of a challenge for street/graffiti artists and is a pattern being replicated all over the city. It will be interesting to see if new areas become popular painting spots in the future.

Ments, Upper York Street, Bristol, October 2019
Ments, Upper York Street, Bristol, October 2019

The piece is so very typical of Ments’ organic style, and this one has a molten metallic feel about it. The letters spell out MENTS (although the T looks like it is missing). I also get a slight sense of the surrealist Yves Tanguy here, or at least the meltinng shapes and shadows reminnd me of his work. A classy and unusual piece.

1919. Wilder Street (24)

This ‘wonder wall’ in Wilder Street is curated by Where the Wall, a Bristol street art tour business and as such it is rarely if ever tagged. It is almost like a showcase wall which guarantees high-quality artwork. The only downside is that the turnover here is glacially slow, maybe every six months or so.

Ments, Wilder Street, Bristol, December 2018
Ments, Wilder Street, Bristol, December 2018

This piece by Ments is one part of a three-piece collaborative wall which includes Sled One and Smak (to follow). Ments has appeared in Natural Adventures many times, but he seems recently to have had an epiphany and he is really branching out from his trademark ‘organic’ work. The writing spells out MENTS and is beautifully worked. The thing with Ments is that he often deviated from any kind of symmetry in his work and does not confine himself to exacting letter shapes or heights etc, which sometimes makes his work look a little out of proportion. I suspect this is deliberate. Lovely piece.

1807. M32 roundabout J3 (99)

In the past when I have posted work by Ments, I usually describe it as being ‘organic’ in nature, with lots of swirls and unusual shapes making up the letters of his name. In this piece however, we see something quite different. What is interesting about this is that If he had used different letters for this piece, I would not have been able to identify the artist. Conversely, if he changed the letters on his regular style, I would still be able to identify the work from the shapes, tones and colours used.

Ments, M32 roundabout, Bristol, October 2018
Ments, M32 roundabout, Bristol, October 2018

This particular piece is easy on the eye and shows us a different side to the talents of the artist. I will be interested to see if he does more of this kind of work in future.

 

 

1781. Thomas Street (2)

On the same recently erected hoarding in Thomas Street where Sled One sprayed his banana piece, is this wonderful organic piece of wildstyle writing from Ments. Normally Ments writes his name, but this piece is so cryptic that although I suspect it says his name I can’t quite make it out, other than an S at the end.

Ments, Thomas Street, Bristol, October 2018
Ments, Thomas Street, Bristol, October 2018

I have always liked the work of Ments because it is so different from pretty much all the rest of the writers in Bristol, usually adopting this mystical, swirly, other-worldly style. His colours often incorporate these purples and oranges. The note ‘Save Hamilton House’ refers to a campaign to protect a building just across the other side of the main road which is at risk of demolition and redevelopment. There are many local studios for artists and the like in Hamilton House and redevelopment would break up this very tight community in Stokes Croft.