Thursday doors – 23 July 2020

Doors 116 – Some random Bristol doors from lock down walks

I have taken a day off work today and so am able to spend a little bit of time sorting out some new doors for you. This is a selection of doors from all around North Bristol from the long dog walks I took during the lock down days.

I am constantly reminded of what strange times we live in that we have developed a whole new language around the coronavirus epidemic, and that we will reference world history in terms of pre-Covid and post-Covid. I find it all very unsettling.

Anyhow – on to the doors. I hope you enjoy them.

Back yard gate, Montpelier, Bristol, May 2020
Back yard gate, Montpelier, Bristol, May 2020
Back yard gate, Montpelier, Bristol, May 2020
Back yard gate, Montpelier, Bristol, May 2020
Back yard gate with graffiti, Montpelier, Bristol, May 2020
Back yard gate with graffiti, Montpelier, Bristol, May 2020
Back yard gate with graffiti, Montpelier, Bristol, May 2020
Back yard gate with graffiti, Montpelier, Bristol, May 2020
Front door in blue, Montpelier, Bristol, May 2020
Front door in blue, Montpelier, Bristol, May 2020
A smart front door with boot scraper, Montpelier, Bristol, May 2020
A smart front door with boot scraper, Montpelier, Bristol, May 2020

So, that’ll be it for another week.  I expect I’ll revert to my graffiti door archive next week, but we’ll have to wait and see. Take care wherever you are and have a great weekend.

If you have made it this far, you probably like doors and you really ought to take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

Thursday doors – 18 June 2020

Doors 111 – Lock down walk doors

It should come as a rather refreshing change that this week’s doors are not from my street art archives, but doors I photographed during lock down on my walks with the dog. I know that the street art doors are popular, and will return to them in due course.

This week’s selection of doors are mainly from the Montpelier and St Werburghs area on what were sleepy streets back in March, but have now resumed almost normal levels of traffic.

An ordinary door with an extraordinary tile surround, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
An ordinary door with an extraordinary tile surround, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Fancy pants door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Fancy pants door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Great colours, a mask and a wall built into the door surround, St Werburghs, Bristol, March 2020
Great colours, a mask and a wall built into the door surround, St Werburghs, Bristol, March 2020
Former door bricked up, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Former door bricked up, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Garden door, St Werburghs, Bristol, March 2020
Garden door, St Werburghs, Bristol, March 2020
Back yard door (note the tagged wheely bin), St Werburghs, Bristol, March 2020
Back yard door (note the tagged wheely bin), St Werburghs, Bristol, March 2020
Tagged door (that tag again), St Werburghs, Bristol, March 2020
Tagged door (that tag again), St Werburghs, Bristol, March 2020

So a little canter around the streets of Sy Werburghs an Montpelier in Bristol, I hope you enjoyed looking at the dors as much as I enjoyed finding and photographing the. That’s it for another week, so I hope you all keep well until next time.

If you have made it this far, you probably like doors and you really ought to take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

 

2937. Montpelier

Combining my love of doors with street art this post is of a really old The Krah piece somewhere in Montpelier, I forget exactly where. I think that he visited Bristol a few years ago, and on his trip dropped a few of these small pieces about the place. In truth I can’t be sure about this, but I have found three of them (two during lock down).

The Krah, Montpelier, Bristol, September 2018
The Krah, Montpelier, Bristol, September 2018

The stencil is sinister… a young woman toting a maching gun and grenade, not what one might expect and from a distance the weapons can’t really be seen. Something different from the old archive.

2872. Montpelier bridge

On the footbridge over the railway that divides St Werburghs and Montpelier is this lovely panel piece by Lobe. I had no idea it was here and can’t tell you how old it is, but it looks pretty fresh to me, and if it is old, has weathered pretty well.

Lobe, Montpelier, Bristol, April 2020
Lobe, Montpelier, Bristol, April 2020

I think that finding pieces that you don’t know about is by far the most rewarding for a street art hunter (incidentally a phrase I dislike – it has the ring of ‘trainspotter’ about it), and when it is by an artist you admire that makes it a little more special. Lobe has managed to get the piece to fit the space perfectly, and some thought has gone into it. Great hair and hat. Love the piece… perhaps she should to more here.

Thursday doors – 9 April 2020

Doors 101 – More Montpelier doors.

The new world in which we all find ourselves is taking a little getting used to. I have managed to get out and walk the dog every day (the dog I never really wanted, but wouldn’t be without now) and have found something of a routine, which helps to maintain some kind of sanity. Recently, Montpelier and St Werburghs have been destinations of choice, not least because of the rich seam of doors to be found there.

This selection from a couple of weeks ago are typical of the Montpelier area. Montpelier is an interesting district and is at the heart of middle/working class alternative thinking and alternative lifestyles sometimes rather romantically depressed up as a Bohemian hub. Certainly the area is artistic and there is a real mix of housing from rather grand to not so grand. For door lovers this eclectic mix provides so much opportunity. Expect more doorscursions from me in Montpelier in the coming crazy weeks ahead.

No more chit chat (relief all round). Some doors:

Worn and weathered garage door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Worn and weathered garage door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Garden gate, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Garden gate, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Garden gate, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Garden gate, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Door within a sliding door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Door within a sliding door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020

This garage/workshop door really is my kind of door. It has everything… character, door within a door, function, age, neglect all round interest. My pick of the week.

A pair of doors with beautiful stained glass widows above, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
A pair of doors with beautiful stained glass widows above, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Door with beautiful stained glass widows above, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Door with beautiful stained glass widows above, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020

The last two pictures of doors were included not so much for the doors themselves, but more for the very stylish stained glass triptych above. I can feel myself thinking ‘they just don’t make ‘em like they used to’ when I see door architecture like this. Modern design and materials are all well and good, but cost has compromised so much in the way of decoration.

That’s your lot for another week – there will be more next time. May I take this opportunity to wish you all a happy Easter and happy Passover

If you have made it this far, you probably like doors and you ought to take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

by Scooj

 

 

Thursday doors – 2 April 2020

Doors 100 – Montpelier doors

I become a centenarian with this post – have I really done a hundred of these? With an average of about five doors per post, that is some five hundred doors I have shared on Natural Adventures. I hope you have enjoyed them as much as I have.

This week’s collection is from a dog walk over the weekend which took me into the depths of Montpelier, a Bohemian district of Bristol sandwiched between St Paul’s, St Andrews and Stokes Croft.

The dog has become my ticket (him and the allotment) out of the house for my daily exercise fix and because I take fairly random routes for my walks I am exposed to a whole ton of new door opportunities. I guess you might call these dog-doorscursions.

Enough chit chat, here is this week’s selection:

Artistic/badly painted door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Artistic/badly painted door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Old-style door with awning, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Old-style door with awning, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Pink door with a stained glass sun, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Pink door with a stained glass sun, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
How to make a secure entrance look cheerful, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
How to make a secure entrance look cheerful, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Utility door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Utility door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020

I hope that I can bring you more doors next week.

If you have made it this far, you probably like doors and you ought to take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

Thursday doors – 26 March 2020

Doors 99 – Dog walk doors

What a week. This is my first Thursday doors post since the lock down was imposed in the UK, and it is a very unsettling and confusing time for us all. Under our rules we are allowed one outing a day for personal exercise, provided we follow all the social distancing rules.

I am alternating my exercise of choice between working on the allotment and walking the dog (in my wildest dreams I never thought that the dog would offer me the means of temporary escape from ‘house arrest’). Yesterday we took a walk down to Stokes Croft and Montpelier and, never one to pass up an opportunity, I photographed some doors.

Just in case you thought this might be irresponsible, I kept my distance from the few people that were out (mostly, like me, exercising in some way), and carried out all the necessary hand washes before leaving and on return home. One observation was that I saw more homeless people on the streets than I saw homed people… I worry about their fate, a group already likely to be more prone to sickness and with nowhere to go to keep clean.

So here are some doors from my exercise dog walk:

Green gates, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Green gates, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Pink door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Pink door, Montpelier, Bristol, March 2020
Two doors and a tiled entrance, Cheltenham Road, Bristol, March 2020
Two doors and a tiled entrance, Cheltenham Road, Bristol, March 2020
Garden gate, Ashley Road, Bristol, March 2020
Garden gate, Ashley Road, Bristol, March 2020
Solicitor's door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2020
Solicitor’s door, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2020

 

Well that’s it for this extraordinary week during an extraordinary period in all our lives.

If you have made it this far, you probably like doors and you ought to take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

by Scooj

Thursday doors – 6 February 2020

Doors 95 – Charley Box

I was wandering around Montpelier (Bristol) recently hunting down a specific piece of street art that I wanted to photograph (it’s actually on the right hand end wall of this building). My eye was drawn to this rather lovely door and then to the plaque above it. The cell behind the door is known as Charley’s box.

Charley Box plaque, Montpelier, Bristol, February 2020
Charley Box plaque, Montpelier, Bristol, February 2020

Before 1836 there was no police force in Bristol, so until some kind of law and order was formally established Montpelier employed its own nightwatchman called Charley (I’m not sure I believe this). Charley had the powers of arrest and would grab unruly citizens and chuck them into this cell overnight until a sobering trip to the magistrates the following morning. I believe the building is now privately owned but the original door appears to still be there, which is lucky for this post.

Charley Box door, Montpelier, Bristol, February 2020
Charley Box door, Montpelier, Bristol, February 2020

So only the one door this week – I have been rather busy I’m afraid.

If you like doors, you ought to take a look at the Norm 2.0 blog – the originator of Thursday Doors where there are links to yet more doors in the comments section at the end.

 

by Scooj

2026. Mina Road (3)

OK, so I’m cheating a little bit. Some of you might have seen this piece in my Thursday Doors post last week, but it is deserving of a mention in my street art section too. A ‘belt and braces’ approach to sharing this one.

Face 1st and Soap, Mina Road, Bristol, February 2019
Face 1st and Soap, Mina Road, Bristol, February 2019

It is, of course, a collaboration between PWA members Soap and Face 1st and has such a charming quality to it. Add to that the location on some kind of municipal building behind a secured gate and you have all the makings of great urban street art.

Face 1st and Soap, Mina Road, Bristol, February 2019
Face 1st and Soap, Mina Road, Bristol, February 2019

I can’t quite figure it out, but there is something about the balance of the piece and the space it occupies that makes this a real winner for me.

 

 

Thursday doors

Door 40

Door, Montpelier, Bristol
Door, Montpelier, Bristol

I saw this door yesterday, while on a short walkabout looking for (yes…predictably) street art. The door is situated at the bottom end of a walled garden belonging to a house called Field House – the words can just about be seen engraved into the keystone at the top of the arch. That was all I knew about the place, so I set to work…thank you Interweb.

Door, Montpelier, Bristol
Door, Montpelier, Bristol

The House, which is Grade II listed, was built in the early part of the 19th century, and when it was first built, there was not much in the way of other buildings in the immediate vacinity.

Field House, Montpelier 1828
Field House, Montpelier 1828

You can see Field House in the map above appearing as a square in the centre of the picture – the garden is still intact today.

Field House, Montpelier, 1855
Field House, Montpelier, 1855

Not an awful lot has changed by 1855, but the map is a little bit more detailed. There is a small outbuilding in the bottom corner of the garden.

Field House, Montpelier, 1880s
Field House, Montpelier, 1880s

By the 1880s there is a major change and many new houses have appeared, especially to the north of Field House. Urbanisation, population growth and the impacts of the industrial revolution will all have contributed to the spread of housing in the city.

Field House, Montpelier, 1900s
Field House, Montpelier, 1900s

By the 1900s the area had become swamped by the growth of the city, however, the walled garden has remained and is a small oasis and time capsule of how things were.

I took a peek through the door and the garden is no longer a grand garden with organised flowerbeds, but is laid out as a split level lawn…looking very yellow due to the lack of rain with one or two trees. The outbuilding is no longer there.

Great to understand a little more about what lies behind a door.

by Scooj

More doors at: Thursday Doors – Norm 2.0