1492. Stokes Croft, the Carriageworks (37)

I have been posting about the work of Face 1st for a long time now, and he really is one of my favourite artists in Bristol. His simple formula of combining the word FACE with a face incorporated never ceases to impress me. I have also noticed that he has started to become active on Instagram, which will help me to keep on top of his work and maybe find out a little bit more about him.

Face 1st, The Carriageworks, Bristol, April 2018
Face 1st, The Carriageworks, Bristol, April 2018

This piece on the Carriageworks in Stokes Croft is from a little while ago, but is one of the last few to be sprayed on this building which is now fenced off as the long awaited (decades) development work on the site has begun. The site was a bit grotty, but part of the character of the area will be lost forever once the graffiti and street art are no longer incorporated. Gentrification is gaining pace in the area.

Since I started wrioting posts about Face 1st, I have been calling him Face F1st…uit is a difficult thing to do once you have a habit, but I will from no on refer to him as Face 1st (which will bugger up my archive searches a little but there you go).

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1423. Stokes Croft, the Carriageworks (37)

You can’t turn your back for one minute in Stokes Croft. If you do, you run the risk of missing out on a clean piece of artwork. This wonderful surreal piece by Tom Miller had only been up a day or two before being tagged over. I find it strange that the perpetraters respected the work enough to tag the black surround, but left the central part largely untouched. Either respect the piece or don’t, but this faux politeness is a joke.

Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2018
Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2018

Once again Tom Miller challenges our conventional world with a burst of colour and a figure whose head appears to be exploding off its body. I think that Miller has an unbelievable talent and extraordinary imagination. Best of all, I like it that he uses the streets as a gallery so that Bristol citizens have free access to his talents.

Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2018
Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, March 2018

Although his subject matter might not be to everyone’s taste, it is clear that we are witnessing the emergence and development of a very special talent.

1415. Stokes Croft, the Carriageworks (36)

I love this piece which has remained intact and unspoiled for such a very long time in Stokes Croft. It is beautifully well proportioned and the shading is first class – it is a crisp and fresh piece of writing that stands out from the mess around it. The artist is Sofly

Sofly, Stokes Croft, Bristol, December 2017
Sofly, Stokes Croft, Bristol, December 2017

On trying to find out a bit more about Sofly, I managed to find her website. It turns out Sophy Robson is a nail artist from London who appears to be at the top of her game, and as a sideline she runs graffiti workshops. How brilliant is that? I know she has visited Bristol on a few occasions, and I have another of her pieces from Dean Lane somewhere in my archives. I love this a lot.

1378. Stokes Croft, the Carriageworks (35)

This old one in Stokes Croft is by DNT, most of whose street work ends up in this immediate vacinity. I particularly like this image, because of all the other bits of graffiti around it. It says something about this spot.

DNT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, April 2016
DNT, Stokes Croft, Bristol, April 2016

Just to the left is a brilliant wheatpaste of Jodie Foster by french artist Tian, and to the right (cut off) is a piece by Mr Klue and Akarat. I love this tank, so full of movement and smoking guns/spray cans, however I’m not too sure who the piece is about – it might well be a tribute piece to Buzz. This has been tucked away on my archive way too long.

1329. Stokes Croft, the Carriageworks (34)

It has been a while but it is always worth waiting for any works by Tom Miller. Tom is a hugely talented fine artist who creates wonderful and sometimes slightly disturbing surreal pieces, often involving distorted body parts.

Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, February 2018
Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, February 2018

This piece is located in one of Miller’s favourite spots and catches the eye of passing pedestrians and motorists, more than other work here. His artwork is very different and really stands out – we are lucky to see gallery quality paintings on the street.

Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, February 2018
Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, February 2018

There is a lot of symbolism in this piece…a hand instead of a face clutching a heart from which an arm is extending clutching another heart. So many ideas and bits of detail to marvel at, and all set on a background of light shades, shapes and colours. I love this piece and admire the artist hugely.

Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, February 2018
Tom Miller, Stokes Croft, Bristol, February 2018

Sadly, nothing lasts forever, and the piece only lasted about a week before it was sprayed over by what looks like a thelocknessmonster piece. I know which I’d rather have hanging up at home.

1225. Stokes Croft, the Carriageworks (30)

The facade of the Carriageworks is living on borrowed time. The building has been in limbo for many years and is in a state of semi-dereliction. The owners appear to be waiting for the right offer to come in from potential developers before selling up. As a result, the bricked up archways have played host to some exceptional pieces of street art over the years, and has been a ‘go to’ location for locals and international artists alike.

Mr Klue, Stokes Croft, Bristol, December 2017
Mr Klue, Stokes Croft, Bristol, December 2017

The turnover of artwork has reduced dramatically as talk of redevelopment hots up but there has been a recent spate of work from local artists. One of those is the fabulous Mr Klue, whose abstract pieces I love and have featured countless times here before. He described this freestyle piece as a ‘quick ting’ on his Instagram account. I haven’t seen any street pieces by Mr Klue since Upfest, so this was a real pleasure to find and photograph. More please Mr K.

979. Stokes Croft, the Carriageworks (28)

I hope that by posting this piece I will learn more about it from others who may know about it. I don’t recognise the artist, whose name appears to be ISRA, and no amount of Interweb searches have yeilded anything. What I can say is that this is a stunning piece with an extraordinary colour palette, modest and low key.

ISRA, Stokes Croft, Bristol, August 2017
ISRA, Stokes Croft, Bristol, August 2017

The protrait is quite incredible, and is complemented beautifully by the abstract colour pattern to its right. This is a rare piece from an unknown artist, but a work of real quality.

ISRA, Stokes Croft, Bristol, August 2017
ISRA, Stokes Croft, Bristol, August 2017

These arches at the Carriageworks are on borrowed time, as the building is due to be renovated and turned into flats that nobody from these parts will be able to afford, but wealthy landlords will snap up to make a tidy profit on. Perpetuating the housing crisis and buy-to-let economy which prices the poor out of affordable accomodation. Rant over.

ISRA, Stokes Croft, Bristol, August 2017
ISRA, Stokes Croft, Bristol, August 2017

I am determined to enjoy these fine pieces on these arches for as long as I am able. Gentrification happens everywhere and it is not all bad.