2139. Park Street (3)

There is this rather interesting crossover that occurs when a street artist paints a commission and I can never quite admire a commission as much as a piece from the heart. Maybe that is just me. On the one hand, businesses are supporting artists and paying them for their work, and this is so obviously a great thing. On the other hand, the artist paints to a brief and in some sense loses a degree of freedom. This piece, by the brilliant Silent Hobo, was commissioned by Averys – one of Bristol’s long-established wine merchants, and is actually perfect for the location.

Silent Hobo, Park Street, Bristol, March 2019
Silent Hobo, Park Street, Bristol, March 2019

Once again, we have a Bristol fox featured in a piece of local street art… note to self, I must do a ‘fox gallery’ sometime. The stairway is at the bottom of Park Street and leads directly into Frogmore Road that runs underneath. Follow the sign to Averys and you will walk past two outstanding JPS stencils and a wonderful 3Dom abstract piece. Not to mention the Banksy nearby. A little street art hotspot.

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1712. Upfest 2018 (37)

John Curtis is a well-known Bristol artist who specialises in urban landscapes and whose work is recognisable from his use of colours and long lines. I have only seen studio pieces by this artist before, so it was interesting to see how his work translated to a large wall. If I am honest it is exactly the same, only bigger. Brilliant really.

John Curtis, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018
John Curtis, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018

I think that this is a picture of Park Street in Bristol looking up at the Wills Memorial building up on the right hand side, although it might be somewhere else altogether. I love the night-time atmosphere that is brought to life in this piece. Highly accomplished and highly recommended to look at in the flesh It is in the passage way into the courtyard of the Steam Crane pub at the end of North Street.

1622. Park Street

We used to eat at Jamie’s Italian on Park Street reasonably often as it was a restaurant that the whole family liked. Sadly his business overstretched itself and had to close a whole ton of branches, including this one in Bristol. On the upside though, the hoarding on the outside has been beautifully decorated with a Cheba and Inkie collaboration.

Inkie and Cheba, Park Street, Bristol, July 2018
Inkie and Cheba, Park Street, Bristol, July 2018

This piece speaks volumes about the independent and individual culture of Bristol – that street art is sanctioned and even encouraged onto one of the most iconic shopping streets in the city and that the piece itself is bright and cheery and a bold statement of pride about the street itself. The work was sponsored by the Bristol Buisness Improvement District (BID) and was painted at the start of July.

Looking at the artwork itself, it is quite difficult to see an Inkie piece and not read the word Inkie in it. I swear I read Inkie whenever I see it. Cheba dose what Cheba does and provides a splendid cosmic backdrop for the letters. A fine collaboration and ‘in your face’ (in a nice way) piece of Bristol street art.

51. Frogmore Street (3)

Standing on the bridge at the bottom of Park Street looking North East, you are treated to the most wonderful stencil by Banksy.

Banksy, Frogmore Street, Bristol
Banksy, Frogmore Street, Bristol

‘Man hanging’ which probably goes by several different names was sprayed in 2006, and led to something of a watershed in a permissive stance from the Bristol City Council regarding what was then called graffiti. There is a lovely article written at the time from the BBC website. How things have come on in relatively few years.

Banksy, Frogmore Street, from Park Street, Bristol
Banksy, Frogmore Street, from Park Street, Bristol

I am fortunate enough to walk past this iconic Banksy twice a day at least, and I am never bored by it. In 2009 the work was attacked with blue paint, calling into question all sorts of difficult conversations about street art and graffiti and vandalism and ‘he had it coming to him for selling out’ etc etc. For me it is just a pity. It seems that with his art, if you are not there in the first day or two, it will get damaged or removed.

Banksy, man hanging
Banksy, man hanging

9.5/10