4029. Stokes Croft

This outstanding Frankenstein’s monster piece is definitely a Halloween contribution from Kosc, an artist on fire at the moment. Look at how the piece stands out and demands to be looked at against the dreary backdrop of hoardings and buffed wall outside the Blue Mountain.

Kosc, Stokes Croft, Bristol, October 2021
Kosc, Stokes Croft, Bristol, October 2021

This series of greyscale pieces set on an orange background is becoming a bit of a strong theme in Kosc’s portfolio, and a thoroughly enjoyable one at that. There is great use of tone in this piece, providing depth and facial contours that lift the features on the monster’s face so well.

Kosc, Stokes Croft, Bristol, October 2021
Kosc, Stokes Croft, Bristol, October 2021

I first came across this artist’s work in Moon Street, which runs parallel with Stokes Croft at the back of Blue Mountain, and it would seem that this is a spot favoured by Kosc. This is good news indeed, because few artists seem to bother with the area these days, compared to a few years ago. Great stuff, and enjoy a spooky evening.

3993. Picton Lane (11)

Kosc really is an extraordinary talent, especially as, under a different name, he is a graffiti writer with an utterly different style. Pieces like this are serious business for Kosc who is fine-tuning his skills for these photorealistic portraits and writing.

Kosc, Picton Lane, Bristol, August 2021
Kosc, Picton Lane, Bristol, August 2021

Picton Lane is a wonderful Bristol backstreet in Montpelier that plays host to some classic pieces, of which this is one. I remember seeing it as a work in progress a long time ago, but didn’t get back until quite recently to enjoy it as a finished piece. I am full of admiration for the piece. It is so good, and I am not sure that I would be doing it justice by waffling on like I usually do, and I am doing right now.

Kosc, Picton Lane, Bristol, August 2021
Kosc, Picton Lane, Bristol, August 2021

Kosc has reached a new level this year, and it is difficult to know how much higher he can take it. I wonder whether he should do a street art festival circuit to get better known outside Bristol, but that takes a lot of commitment. This black and white face is just awesome.

Kosc, Picton Lane, Bristol, August 2021
Kosc, Picton Lane, Bristol, August 2021

The tiniest tinge of colour is provided by the magpie’s tail, but it is enough to lift the whole piece just that little bit more. It is Kosc’s attention to detail that makes this piece sing. An absolute beauty.

3923. Picton Mews (3)

Back in February 2020 I published a post for Thursday doors that featured the Charley Box in Montpelier. Kosc has gone one step further and produced this extraordinary piece on the side of the Charley Box depicting a miscreant who would have been caught while up to no good by the local nightwatchman and locked up in the little jail for the night to cool down.

Kosc, Picton Mews, Bristol, August 2021
Kosc, Picton Mews, Bristol, August 2021

Kosc has been producing some of the best portrait pieces in Bristol lately, with his greyscale faces and bright, vibrant backgrounds. In this piece, Kosc is playing with us duplicating the face of the character in a double exposure manner that we used to see a lot of in the days when we used little Kodak Instamatics to take pictures of our families or pets. He has also created a scene so totally relevant for the place and is helping to bring local history to life. An outstanding artwork.

3845. Gloucester Road

I ran past this piece from Kosc this morning, and in a curious way I felt rather proud that I live in a city where public art is embraced, albeit sometimes reluctantly embraced. When the artwork is as good as this, then surely a painted hoarding is better than a bare/tagged piece of construction infrastructure.

Kosc, Gloucester Road, Bristol, July 2021
Kosc, Gloucester Road, Bristol, July 2021

The most obvious thing about the piece is the striking contrast between the scarlet background and the grey-scale character and writing. The background is more than a simple backwash, it has been overprinted with a roller with the letters KOSC on it, giving a texture to the background.

The character and writing are absolutely exceptional. The lady in the photograph? Well it seems that she was selected by Kosc from a gallery of pictures on Instagram by @pit_lad, who was more than happy to have it used for this outstanding piece. Kosc is going from strength to strength.

3468. Picton Lane

There is little more I can say about this piece other than it is utterly outstanding. Of course, I can’t leave it like that, so I’ll give you a bit more background. I am guessing it is a commission, because it is on a business wall, but what a commission. The artists are Smak, Sled One and Kosc, and they have smashed this wall out of sight. The only downside is that it is an absolute beast to photograph on account of being in a narrow lane and on a curved wall.

Kosc, Picton Lane, Bristol, January 2021
Kosc, Picton Lane, Bristol, January 2021

From left to right the artists are Kosc, Smak (SM), Sled One and Smak (AK) and they have used a wonderful combination of black red and grey colours. Decay of old would be in his element. Kosc has painted an amazing photorealistic portrait with a bit of a glitch in it and has spelled out his name. This is simply magnificent. On its own this one third of the piece would be worth the trip.

Kosc, Smak and Sled One, Picton Lane, Bristol, January 2021
Kosc, Smak and Sled One, Picton Lane, Bristol, January 2021
Smak, Picton Lane, Bristol, January 2021
Smak, Picton Lane, Bristol, January 2021

Smak has spread his letters either side of the Sled One piece with the SM sandwiched between Kosc and Sled, with the AK rounding off the piece on the right-hand side. As you would expect from Smak, the letters are flawless and the design simply brilliant.

Sled One, Picton Lane, Bristol, January 2021
Sled One, Picton Lane, Bristol, January 2021

Taking up centre stage in this three-way collaboration is a celebration of the wolf from Little Red Riding Hood. Sled One is the king of crazy creativity, and here the wolf is chewing on a spray can, which is squirting paint on one of two ladybirds in the piece. Look closely at the picnic basket, and you might just see a hint that the wolf hasn’t gobbled our heroine up but has instead squished her into the basket.

This is a glorious collaboration from three of Bristol’s best street artists. get yourslf down there.

Sled One and Smak, Picton Lane, Bristol, January 2021
Sled One and Smak, Picton Lane, Bristol, January 2021

3215. John Street (4)

Kosc is and artist whose black and white portraits are in complete contrast with his other street art work that goes under a different name. He keeps these personas separate and I respect that and will do the same. This is the fourth archway piece that I have posted from this amazing street gallery in John Street. If you live in Bristol, it really is worth seeking out.

Kosc, John Street, Bristol, September 2020
Kosc, John Street, Bristol, September 2020

The portrait (thank you Paul) is of an Australian gangster called De Gracy who was picked up by police in Sydney and his mugshot photograph taken, alongside another gangster called Edward Dalton. I guess Kosc chose this portrait because it works well with light and dark shades and shows off his skills. This is a striking addition to the Archways in John Street.

2807. Moon Street (81)

I couldn’t hold this amazing black and white portrait piece back any longer. ‘Why hold it back at all?’ I hear you ask (in my fertile imagination), well, it is another of those pieces that I know absolutely nothing about, despite some fairly intensive Interweb interrogations.

Kosc, Moon Street, Bristol, February 2020
Kosc, Moon Street, Bristol, February 2020

Moon Street has be host to many different pieces of street art, but nothing like this one in my experience. I don’t know who P. Jacobs is, and I guess the date is a date of birth. Is this a tribute to somebody famous or to somebody dear? What do the formulae mean? There is so much in this work to figure out before even marvelling at the superb portrait itself. This is a piece painted by an accomplished artist, but not someone that has crossed my path before (I think). Those eyes are amazing and follow you around.

Could somebody out there put me out of my misery and telll me who this is by and what it is about?

Thank you Paul. This piece is by Kosc, who has painted this door before.

2276. Moon Street (72)

Regulars will know that I don’t much like to post street art on Natural Adventures when I don’t know who the artist is, but just occasionally I do it because the artwork is too good to ignore and maybe I’ll get to find out who it is as a result of writing about it.

Unknown (Rezwonk?), Moon Street, Bristol, June 2019
Unknown (Rezwonk?), Moon Street, Bristol, June 2019

This wonderful and certainly rather original piece appeared in Moon Street about three weeks ago on a gateway that has been favboured in the past by Rezwonk, which is why I have tentatively attributed it to him. However, although he is capable of something like this, it is not commensurate with most of the writing work he has been doing recently.

Whoever the artist is, it is a striking painting and brings a touch of class to the street, which is well known for its tagging and high turnover. I love the anatomical diagram, and particularly the numbering. Something like this would certainly liven up a waiting room in a doctor’s surgery or hospital.

Update –  14 March 2020 – it is by Kosc.