2402. New Stadium Road (19)

I have a feeling that this might be another Monday Club collaboration, this time from Conrico and Rebecca Prince with what might be her debut street piece. (Actually if I had bothered looking properly I’d have noticed the words Monday Club – d’oh)

Conrico, New Stadium Road, Bristol, August 2019
Conrico, New Stadium Road, Bristol, August 2019

Conrico has really impressed me since he appeared on the scene a few months ago. His work has such a strong narrative about it and his illustrative style is imaginative and creative. I believe that he painted this dragon on the M32 roundabout but it didn’t last very long, the turnover on this wall isn’t quite as high.

Rebecca Prince, New Stadium Road, Bristol, August 2019
Rebecca Prince, New Stadium Road, Bristol, August 2019

Rebecca Prince is a Bristol artist whose Instagram feed would suggest that she has only very recently started painting walls. I think she has yet to find her touch, but I am very much looking forward to seeing her develop and translate her lovely drawings into great wall art. I love people giving it a go and having the courage to take to the walls.

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2323. North Street

Mid-way along North Street is a rather nice craft shop called Creative space, and recently Andy Council gave the upper level a fabulous makeover. I think it was part of the Upfest Summer Editions event, which has more than made up for the lack of a full blown festival this year.

Andy Council, North Street, Bristol, June 2019
Andy Council, North Street, Bristol, June 2019

The space is not an easy one to paint and I think that Andy Council has made a great job of creating a symmetrical piece over the two windowswith what looks like two Chinese dragons facing off in the middle.

Andy Council, North Street, Bristol, June 2019
Andy Council, North Street, Bristol, June 2019

As with all his pieces, if you take a little look closer you can see that it is made up of buildings and architectural features, and around the beasts there is a liberral sprinkling of toadstools. This is a stunning piece (difficult to photograph on account of the bright skies behind) that exemplifies the talents of this most treasured Bristol artist.

2102. Nelson Street (10)

Kin Dose (part 2)

So, continuing on from my last post, it seems almost inconceivable that the same artist could paint two street masterpieces on the same building in the space of a couple of weeks, but somehow Kin Dose has done it and pulled it off with consummate style.

Kin Dose, Nelson Street, Bristol, March 2019
Kin Dose, Nelson Street, Bristol, March 2019

In this second piece the artist has created a scene with an oriental ‘Hokusai’ sea and waves harbouring a lotus flower and koi carp. In the centre of the sea is an island with an ornate dragon whose face is highlighted by a full moon.

Kin Dose, Nelson Street, Bristol, March 2019
Kin Dose, Nelson Street, Bristol, March 2019

This piece is rather difficult to photograph because of the nature of the wall, which incorporates a staircase, and the amount of street furniture knocking around, so I would recommend that any Bristolian reading this gets themself down to Nelson Street to witness this for themselves.

Kin Dose, Nelson Street, Bristol, March 2019
Kin Dose, Nelson Street, Bristol, March 2019

The dragon is beautifully painted and nicely detailed, but it is the amazing contrast with the red sky and white moon that really lifts this beast from the wall. The tail of the dragon disappears into the sea to the left of the piece.

Kin Dose, Nelson Street, Bristol, March 2019
Kin Dose, Nelson Street, Bristol, March 2019

The whole thing is magnificent. How much more can Kin Dose give?

1578. St Werburghs tunnel (26)

Getting to know an artist and to become familiar with their style and content is all part of the fun of hunting street art. I have only seen three pieces by KiKi? and so far haven’t been able to find anything on digital media about them. In a way, knowing nothing is a great place to start because you can come to your own conclusions about the work without external influences creating any bias .

KiKi, St Werburghs, Bristol, June 2018
KiKi, St Werburghs, Bristol, June 2018

I can honestly say from my limited exposure to KiKi that I am very struck by their work. It all feels pretty organic and centered around animals and beasts of one sort or another. This piece looks like some kind of Chinese dragon breathing fire and has an archaic feel to it…something you might see on the side of a temple for example.

KiKi, St Werburghs, Bristol, June 2018
KiKi, St Werburghs, Bristol, June 2018

The light at the ends of the St Werburghs tunnel make it very difficult to get an evenly lit picture, but even with the poor quality of photograph, I think you can see that this is a fine piece of work. I need to try and find out more about KiKi.

KiKi?, M32 Spot, Bristol, May 2018
KiKi?, M32 Spot, Bristol, May 2018

854. New Stadium Road (1)

There was a time when every few posts that I wrote was another work from the productive master of writing – Deamze. He is still as productive as ever, but his pieces are having to compete for space with the dozens and dozens of other Bristol artists that I try to cram into this website.

Deamze, New Stadium Road, Bristol, June 2017
Deamze, New Stadium Road, Bristol, June 2017

This is a piece from under the M32 motorway, not far from the M32 Spot. This is an area that Deamze appears to favour, and there are always several of his pieces nearby. This piece is in his format of a cartoon character accompanying some highly designed wildstyle writing.

Deamze, New Stadium Road, Bristol, June 2017
Deamze, New Stadium Road, Bristol, June 2017

As with so many of his pieces, I am not too sure who the cartoon critter is. I thought at first it might be Wally Gator, but it isn’t…it appears to be a dragon. Any ideas? Another classy piece from the Bristol master

399. Nine Tree Hill (4)

It has been a little while since DNT or Akarat graced these pages, so here is a reasonably recent collaboration, or perhaps better, co-location of these two great local graffiti artists. The dragon is by DNT (Bruno Dante) and the fish on the utility box are by Akarat. I didn’t see the fish the first time, which is something of a gaffe for a marine and fisheries biologist who prides himself on observational skills.

DNT and Akarat, Nine Tree Hill, Bristol, August 2016
DNT and Akarat, Nine Tree Hill, Bristol, August 2016

This is a fairly quiet collaboration tucked on a side street just off the main drag of Stokes Croft. I love to see their work, and together with other local artists, they really do keep things fresh. Great dragon, great fish…different styles meeting.

Akarat, Nine Tree Hill, Bristol, August 2016
Akarat, Nine Tree Hill, Bristol, August 2016

296. All Saints’ Street

One of the great achievements of the See No Evil street art events in 2011 and 2012 has been the way in which the large pieces have now become local landmarks in the Nelson Street area. In a city where the turnover of street art tends to be incredibly high, it is great to have these untouched iconic pieces that form the backbone of some of the tourist street art tours. I have said it before though, the best thing about the scene here in Bristol is the huge spectrum of work from DBK tagging through to pieces by the world class Pixel Pancho.

Pixel Pancho, All Saints' Street, Bristol, June 2016
Pixel Pancho, All Saints’ Street, Bristol, June 2016

This lovely piece by Pixel Pancho is instantly recognisable as one of his by the use of mechanical elements blended with the biological, to give a robotic appearance. Having one of his works here in Bristol, made it all the better when I recently saw him at work in New York.

Pixel Pancho, All Saints' Street, Bristol, June 2016
Pixel Pancho, All Saints’ Street, Bristol, June 2016

I have yet to see a decent photograph of this piece. It is high on a wall on a shaded side of the street and is difficult to frame without getting light pollution from the surrounding skyline. The colours always look washed out, unless they have been digitally enhanced.

This is a real cultural asset for Bristol.