3173. Temple Way (1)

There is so much construction work going on in Bristol it is quite mind-boggling, and this in the shadow of ten years of austerity and now a coronavirus recession – there are obviously still large bags of money out there. Construction usually means that, for a short while at least, temporary hoardings will be installed, and if you are lucky the constructors may commission street artists to paint them in the hope that they don’t get covered in unattractive tags.

Kin Dose, Temple Way, Bristol, September 2020
Kin Dose, Temple Way, Bristol, September 2020

Temple way is no stranger to construction, but may be a stranger to the talents of Kin Dose whose meerkat piece is outstanding in every way. Kin Dose uses an airbrush technique that allows him to create the detail in the fur and the tree branch and so on. Sit back and enjoy this wonderful masterpiece from one of the very best.

2868. Upper York Street (20)

A whole block of buildings bar one house on Upper York Street has been demolished and the site is being developed. While this meant that some great graff walls disappeared, they have been temporarily replaced with hoardings. A week or two back some Bristol artists hit the hoardings and this piece from Decay was painted then.

Decay, Upper York Street, Bristol, April 2020
Decay, Upper York Street, Bristol, April 2020

This is a really nice piece from Decay in which he has adopted a slightly different typeface design from the one we are used to seeing. The red line outline provides a nice 3D effect and the painted drips (as opposed to drippy drips) are a nice touch.

This wall is not easy to photograph due to the big sky above it, and afternoons are very tricky indeed – I have been foolish enough to walk down there on three sunny afternoons! This might explain the slightly washed-out look in these pictures.

2689. Park Street Avenue

Well, I never did get a clean shot of this great two-tone piece by RichT and now of course it has gone forever, so this is the best I have. RichT has quite an unusual style in which he tends to fill the ‘canvass’ from top to bottom with decoration and detail, there are no ‘white spaces’ in his work – busy and interesting.

RichT, Park Street Avenue, Bristol, December 2018
RichT, Park Street Avenue, Bristol, December 2018

This piece was painted on a hoarding half way up Park Street on a building that seems to have been going through a renovation for a very long time. The work has been there for most of it, but wheely bins and scaffolding have been at the scourge of decent street photography. I still felt the piece was worth posting though as I do rather like RichT’s work.

1916. Ashley Road (19)

What a superb piece by Alex Lucas in the heart of Alex Lucas land. The artist and illustrator fills a niche in the Bristol commission market and is probably one of the most recognised artists in the city. Because nearly all of her work is commissioned, it tends to remain in situ for a very long while.

Alex Lucas, Ashley Road, Bristol, December 2018
Alex Lucas, Ashley Road, Bristol, December 2018

This piece, wonderful as it is..and it really is…leaves me a little conflicted, not because of the artwork, but because before the development work behind the hoarding started, this used to be a regular ‘illegal’ wall for artists to try out their work, much of it outstanding. This is the gentrification process in full swing, the succession being; Illegal (tolerated) wall – permitted/commission wall – no wall (policed).

It is a sad but inevitable journey for most of our inner cities, and these areas are often in need of some TLC. My objection is that what will emerge from behind the hoarding will be unaffordable flats, little in the way of community assets and a sterilisation of a colourful area. The only people to benefit will be the people with money and power.

Let’s enjoy the hoardings while we can.

1433. Brunswick Square hoardings (4)

I was very fond of these hoardings in Brunswick Square, but alas, they are long since gone.I still have several pieces that I have not posted, and this is one of them by Dibz. I am more used to seeing his work at Dean Lane or on Instagram, so it is nice to have another location for the collection.

Dibz, Brunswick Square hoardings, Bristol, March 2016
Dibz, Brunswick Square hoardings, Bristol, March 2016

As always his deep shading and complex letter patterns are technically superb, and there is a cleanness of the lines in all his work. The blue line and its glow add something special to a very nice piece indeed.

1143. Camden Town, London

On a recent trip to Camden Town, I visited a few of the streets I had been to a year previously. This particular hot spot for street art was rather annoyingly obstructed by this hoarding, which rendered any photography pretty useless, along the narrow passage where the best walls are. However, it was an ill wind really, as the hoarding has become the canvass for this fine and rather haunting piece by Irony.

Irony, Camden Town, London, November 2017
Irony, Camden Town, London, November 2017

I could tell, the minute I saw this portrait piece, that is was by an established and talented artist, but it wasn’t until I got home and properly looked at the pictures (and started seeing the image appearing on Instagram) that I realised it was by Irony. I am guessing that it is a reasonably new piece, and feel quite lucky to have ‘bumped into it’.

408. Old Bread Street (7)

Every now and then I begin to think I know quite a lot about street art in Bristol. I write about it every day, and feature dozens of different artists in this blog. And then…I visit one of my favourite sites and see this, and realise I have so much more to learn.

Mr Penfold, Old Bread Street, Bristol, September 2016
Mr Penfold, Old Bread Street, Bristol, September 2016

It is always exciting coming across a new artist, but also a little threatening…how could I have missed them? Who are they? Are they local? Many doubts begin to challenge your knowledge and credibility. Then I have the light-bulb moment…I am doing this for fun, not to be judged. This is not work, it is a passion, and learning and discovery are my companions on this journey. I didn’t know anything about Mr Penfold (Tim Gresham), before I saw this, maybe I should have done but I have never seen his work before. This piece is so different and eye-catching, I had to find out more and write about it.

Mr Penfold, Old Bread Street, Bristol, September 2016
Mr Penfold, Old Bread Street, Bristol, September 2016

Mr Penfold (thirty-something) is originally from Cambridge, now based in Bristol,  and works using various media and surfaces. Clearly a disciplined designer, he applies his talents to graphics, advertising, painting and street art. His work is very distinctive, and appears to draw on what I consider to be quite an ’80s and ’90s look. On reading his Facebook page I see that he has done another recent piece near where I work, so watch this space for more Mr Penfold.

Sorry about the water on the lens!

304. Brusnwick Square hoardings (2)

I have been keeping my powder dry on this one for a long time now. I’m not too sure why. I think it might be because it is another one of my favourite collaborations in Bristol, by three of my favourite street artists: Sepr, Deamze and 3Dom. I like to have this one sitting in my pending file, reminding me just how good some of this stuff is. Today I am setting the pieces free and moving on. Liberation.

Sepr, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
Sepr, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016

Sepr, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
Sepr, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016

The left hand side of the triptych is by Sepr and shows a man driving a wheeled vehicle, incorporating the next part of the collaboration. Once more he uses his simple colour scheme that seems to bring out the detail in the character’s face. There is a great sense of movement.

Deamze, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
Deamze, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016

Deamze, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
Deamze, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016

The middle section is a wildstyle piece by Deamze, incorporating all the elements that make his writing so recognisable. Just to make it extra easy he even signs it for us. The flow of colour continues from left to right and into the third part of the collaboration.

3Dom, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
3Dom, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016

The right hand side of the project is by 3Dom. This is a brilliant cartoon dreamlike character – a dark round ball with face and teeth and everything – riding on a chopper bicycle at speed towards the other pieces. The dust clouds are beautifully done.

3Dom, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
3Dom, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016

The three pieces together tell a story, although unfortunately I’m not sure what the plot line is. I really must collar these guys and interview them sometime. Maybe Upfest will be an opportunity to meet and interview a few artists. We’ll see.

 

 

276. Old Bread Street (3)

Every now and then I like to check out the hoardings at Old Bread Street, near the rather peculiar Gardiner Haskins department store. Last weekend I was immensely pleased to see that a bunch of street artists from ASK had collaborated on several of the panels.

Sepr, Old Bread Street, Bristol, June 2016
Sepr, Old Bread Street, Bristol, June 2016

This is a wonderful piece by Sepr. Now who hasn’t had a telephone call like this, especially those of who can remember real telephones with cords? I think that Sepr really conveys the sense of irritation. The man’s expression and the pulling of his own tie speaks volumes – it is almost like a moving image. Very clever.

Sepr, Old Bread Street, Bristol, June 2016
Sepr, Old Bread Street, Bristol, June 2016

The observant among you will see this piece is sandwiched between Deamze and Voyder burners. Great company indeed.

 

 

188. Brunswick Square hoardings (1)

A couple of weeks ago I discovered, quite by accident, a goldmine of new pieces in Brunswick Square, St Pauls. There is a large new development along the south side of the square with hoardings all around it. It would appear that the developers have encouraged Bristol’s finest to decorate the hoardings, and they have done an amazing job.

Inkie, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
Inkie, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016

This piece is by one of Bristol’s most well known street artists, Inkie, and is a bright and colourful wildstyle burner in his very distinct style. A lovely piece.

I will, of course, feature other works from this magnificent site soon.