Prediction

 

May loses her job

UK remains in Europe

I can dream can’t I?

 

by Scooj

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Tusk

 

Brexit campaigners

there’s a special place in hell

for you says Donald.

 

by Scooj

 

Couldn’t help writing about this rather undiplomatic comment and tweet from Donald Tusk, President of the European Council, yesterday:

I’ve been wondering what that special place in hell looks like, for those who promoted , without even a sketch of a plan how to carry it out safely.

Undiplomatic it might be, but probably representative of huge numbers of British people who find ourselves in political meltdown and heading towards decades of uncertainty and economic/political isolation. To use a phrase coined by Theresa May, we will truly become ‘citizens of nowhere’, because the UK will be a hugely less potent and influential nation than it has been for the last 40 years.

The people he refers to are the likes of Boris Johnson, David Davis, Jacob Rees-Mogg and of course the odious Nigel Farage. These leaders of the Brexit campaign stirred up discontent in the country and blamed all our domestic problems on Europe, it was a disingenuous campaign and masked a far right nationalist agenda which had more to do with pride, selfishness, independence, market forces, suspicion, competition, hatred, than it did with being part of the European Union.

I despair. I am ashamed of (and confused by) the choice our country has made. I am worried for the opportunities of my children and their peers. I am embarrassed that we have become a global laughing-stock. I worry about when our own self-imposed austerity will ever end to see us through this mess.

What happened to compassion, partnership, collaboration, the greater good, fairness, balance, people before profit? (you’ll rarely hear such words from Brexit leaders).

David Cameron has divided our nation because he wanted to unite his party. I think there might be room for him in the special place in hell too.

1949. Upfest 2018 (123)

There is so much going on in this magnificent piece by Andrew Burns Colwill, but it is not busy…on the contrary it is calm and peaceful which is somewhat at odds with a fragmenting world it represents.

Andrew Burns Colwill, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018
Andrew Burns Colwill, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018

I like Andrew Burns Colwill very much, both as an artist and as an acquaintance, and I managed to catch up with him a couple of times during the festival. He had started early, so by the time I first found him on the Friday, his work was already well underway.

Andrew Burns Colwill, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018
Andrew Burns Colwill, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018

The piece combines several ideas and themes, but the obvious one is a representation of the biggest issue of our time (other than climate change), Brexit. The world is represented by an apple, and we hold it in our (multicultural) hands.

Andrew Burns Colwill, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018
Andrew Burns Colwill, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018

A bite has been taken from the apple and is seen sinking in the water below. A closer look at the lost piece of apple shows the UK cut-off and drifting away all alone. One can read in so many metaphors into this work – brotherhood, loss, a gift, urbanisation and so on, but for me it is the isolation of the UK that stands out.

Andrew Burns Colwill, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018
Andrew Burns Colwill, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018

A most brilliant piece, and one of the highlights of the 2018 festival.