Gove

 

Dishonourable

backstabbing narcissism;

an embarrassment.

 

by Scooj

 

Still angry and ashamed at the way British politics is playing out. See this haiku I wrote on the subject almost a year ago.

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305. Gathorne Road

 

UPDATE: Inkie informs me via Twitter that this piece is going nowhere and will remain in place after Upfest, which is great news.

This wonderful Inkie is enjoying the last days of the Raj. It was created for Upfest 2015, and will in all likelihood give way to another piece at the 2016 festival in July.

Inkie, Gathorne Road, Bristol, June 2016
Inkie, Gathorne Road, Bristol, June 2016

‘Best thing since sliced bread’ is a wonderful piece by Inkie, incorporating his large block writing, and the styalised girl with flowing hair. Interestingly the girl is in three quarter profile, rather than the silhouetted profile that is more common in his works.

Inkie, Gathorne Road, Bristol, June 2016
Inkie, Gathorne Road, Bristol, June 2016

On the wall of a bakery, this uplifting work fits so perfectly in this quiet street, immediately off North Street. I wonder what will replace it.

304. Brusnwick Square hoardings (2)

I have been keeping my powder dry on this one for a long time now. I’m not too sure why. I think it might be because it is another one of my favourite collaborations in Bristol, by three of my favourite street artists: Sepr, Deamze and 3Dom. I like to have this one sitting in my pending file, reminding me just how good some of this stuff is. Today I am setting the pieces free and moving on. Liberation.

Sepr, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
Sepr, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
Sepr, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
Sepr, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016

The left hand side of the triptych is by Sepr and shows a man driving a wheeled vehicle, incorporating the next part of the collaboration. Once more he uses his simple colour scheme that seems to bring out the detail in the character’s face. There is a great sense of movement.

Deamze, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
Deamze, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
Deamze, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
Deamze, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016

The middle section is a wildstyle piece by Deamze, incorporating all the elements that make his writing so recognisable. Just to make it extra easy he even signs it for us. The flow of colour continues from left to right and into the third part of the collaboration.

3Dom, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
3Dom, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016

The right hand side of the project is by 3Dom. This is a brilliant cartoon dreamlike character – a dark round ball with face and teeth and everything – riding on a chopper bicycle at speed towards the other pieces. The dust clouds are beautifully done.

3Dom, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016
3Dom, Brunswick Square, Bristol, March 2016

The three pieces together tell a story, although unfortunately I’m not sure what the plot line is. I really must collar these guys and interview them sometime. Maybe Upfest will be an opportunity to meet and interview a few artists. We’ll see.

 

 

303. St Andrew’s Road

There are times when you think you know it all, or perhaps I shouldn’t judge…I’ll start again. There are times when I think I know it all (just ask my children), and I thought I pretty much knew where to find all the best places for graffiti and street art are. Writing this blog has shown me how utterly wrong I am. There I’ve said it.

Two dear friends of mine walked home with me a few weeks back, and were terribly polite by showing interest in my rather overbearing desire to tell them all about every piece of art we walked past. Who painted it, when they did it, what was there before, where you might find more of their work, who they collaborate with…and so on…oh my goodness they must have been very bored. They didn’t show it though, they are friends after all.

During our conversation, they asked whether I knew about the Alex Lucas bats piece by Montpelier Park. No I hadn’t. So they took me there straight away, and what a gift.

Alex Lucas, St Andrew's Road, Bristol, March 2016
Alex Lucas, St Andrew’s Road, Bristol, March 2016

This beautiful work by Lucas adorns a small council tool shed on the edge of the park. The bats are so typical of her superb illustrations and so full of character. To top it off she has added a quotation by Gilbert White one of the early and pioneering English naturalists in the eighteenth century and author of Natural History and Antiques of Selborne, a book given to me by my late step father when I was a boy.

Alex Lucas, St Andrew's Road, Bristol, March 2016
Alex Lucas, St Andrew’s Road, Bristol, March 2016

I like everything about this Lucas work. Where it is, the colours, the illustrations, the quotation, the fun of bats ‘playing’, the obvious love for nature, everything.

So I concede I really don’t know where all the street art in Bristol is, and I will be forever grateful to Jon and Jane for pointing this jewel out to me.

302. North Street, Hennesseys

I have talked before about how street art appears and disappears…it is the ephemeral nature of it that drives me to capture and record it so that it should not be entirely lost forever. There is another aspect to the appearance and disappearance of street art that manifests itself in the shape of shutter art.

One can stroll up and down a street countless times and never see half of the art on offer, unless you do it on a Sunday, late in the evening or when shops are closed for some other reason.

Copyright, North Street, Bristol, May 2016
Copyright, North Street, Bristol, May 2016

This beautiful Copyright piece is a case in point. I cannot think how many times I have walked up and down North Street, but only once have I seen this piece. Of course I photographed it immediately. Street art in most of its forms, is not just about the art itself, but also about place and time, which I guess is part of the fascination.

Copyright, North Street, Bristol, May 2016
Copyright, North Street, Bristol, May 2016

There are similarities between this piece and the collaboration recently featured between Copyright and E. Lee.