1793. Upfest 2018 (69)

One of the things I really like about Upfest is that it draws artists from all around the world which in turn gives us a chance to see a spectrum of differing styles influenced by native cultures…and there is a real difference not just an imagined one.

Antonia Lev, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018
Antonia Lev, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018

This is a beautiful piece by Moscow artist Antionia Lev who cites amongst her influences feminism, comic books and Henri Matisse. The latter of those influences is apparent in the colours and some of the shapes in this work. Coincidentally this is the second post in a row to contain a Swiss cheese plant leaf…what are the chances of that? I am very drawn to this piece whuich can be found in the back yard of The Hen and Chicken.

Advertisements

1647. Upfest 2018 (9)

I have seen a few pieces by Bristol artist J. West around the place and posted two or three of them on this blog in the past. He is an animator turned artist and much of his inspiration has come from a spell working at Bristol Zoo Gardens and from David Attenborough TV shows.

J. West, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018
J. West, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018

I haven’t seen too much of his work, but that which I have seen appears to be bilaterally symmetrical and this Upfest piece is no different. I am sorry that I didn’t stop to talk to him because I think we probably share inspirations, but he looked pretty busy, and it is never easy chatting to people with a mask on.

J. West, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018
J. West, Upfest, Bristol, July 2018

I will keep looking out for his distinct style of work, but for me, this piece I think is my favourite that I have seen so far.

1129. SoHo, New York (2)

Walking with my family on the obligatory clothes shopping trip in SoHo, we came across this magnificent tiger by Sonny. It is difficult to convey just how spectacular this piece is. Furthermore the piece is actually raising awareness for the global campaign ‘Project Cat‘ which aims to protect wild tigers and their habitat.

Sonny, SoHo, New York, October 2017
Sonny, SoHo, New York, October 2017

Looking at his website, it seems that Sonny is a specialist in painting large wildlife pieces, and has a special talent for this. I love the way he incorporates patterns into the face of the tiger and how cleverly the colours dribble down from the face to create a pool of blue and yellow.

Sonny, SoHo, New York, October 2017
Sonny, SoHo, New York, October 2017

This is a spectacular piece.

533. Upfest 2016 (72)

This energetic and rather curious looking tiger is by the artist Lewis Campbell who paints under the name of Lost Monkey. Lewis Campbell, who comes from London is an illustrator story board artist who turns his hand to street murals and larger canvasses from time to time.

Lost Monkey, Upfest, Bristol, July 2016
Lost Monkey, Upfest, Bristol, July 2016

This work has loads of energy and an element of menace about it, but also seems to have something of the child about it. The name ‘Lost Monkey’ is (according to his website) a symbol of the potential ideas and imaginings that fill an artist’s head – just bubbling under the radar of the subconscious. As he is a native Londoner, I’m not sure we’ll be seeing a lot of Lost Monkey in Bristol – maybe at Upfest 2017.

Lost Monkey, Upfest, Bristol, July 2016
Lost Monkey, Upfest, Bristol, July 2016

422. North Street, No. 274

This amazing Tiger is no longer there; the wall has since been painted by Jody for Upfest 2016 (more on this to come). The tiger was painted for the Upfest 2015 festival and I never really got round to posting about it.

Osch, North Street, Bristol, September 2015
Osch, North Street, Bristol, September 2015

It is funny how things come about. I didn’t really know the artist, Osch (Otto Schade), until fairly recently and now I seem to be coming across his work all over the place in London. In fact I think I mentioned in a recent post that he hadn’t done much in Bristol. I was wrong, he did this.

Osch, North Street, Bristol, September 2015
Osch, North Street, Bristol, September 2015

The tiger is captivating and uses Osch’s unraveling bandage style of artwork. This work was something of a landmark on North Street and was part of a campaign to raise awareness for the Save Wild Tigers charity.

On the downside, this is one of the most difficult Upfest walls to photograph. It is very high and in a narrow lane and the best views are from a privately accessed roof. I’m afraid I didn’t have access, so my pictures are a little distorted.