299. Wilder Street (6)

There is a small garage at the Western end of Wilder Street which has loads of graffiti art and street art decorating the outer walls. I think this is a rather recent phenomenon as the Google street view maps from June 2014 shows the building with plain white walls only. I have tried to photograph this particular wall a few times, but always there are cars parked in front of it. Patience certainly pays off.

Mr Klue, Wilder Street, Bristol, June 2016
Mr Klue, Wilder Street, Bristol, June 2016

This piece is another wonderful abstract offering from Mr Klue, only this time he has woven into his characteristic swirls and patterns some car wheels. It is really effective and relevant to the site. I am guessing that this was a permitted work rather than a commission, but can’t be sure. It is a fine piece though.

298. New York, Orchard Street

I was reminded about this satirical piece by Hanksy, because Donald Trump has just made a rather unwelcome visit to the UK to inspect his Trump Turnberry refurbished golf course in Scotland. He really is disliked here, and no senior politicians were there to meet him, but I guess they were all too preoccupied with Brexit. He congratulated the Scottish people for leaving the EU, but clearly didn’t understand that The Scottish voted to remain. He really is so thick.

Hanksy, Orchard Street, New York City, June 2016
Hanksy, Orchard Street, New York City, June 2016

Hanksy is a New York street artist who seems to use parody and satire in his work, even the name is playful. He is famous enough to have his own Wikipedia page if you want to know more.  While I was photographing the piece, a lovely local lady started chatting to me and my daughter. She said straight away that nobody likes Trump. That may be the case in NYC but he seems popular elsewhere.

This piece went viral globally, and has much in common with the Paintsmiths piece in Stokes Croft with Trump and Boris kissing. The first part of the nightmare is coming to pass, with David Cameron standing down and Johnson in the running for Prime Minister, the prophetic images may become a reality. I really hope that the USA comes to its senses and doesn’t fall for the populist propaganda aimed at the disadvantaged/disowned working classes. In the UK our citizens were duped by right wing fabrications about immigration and jobs and promises that the money diverted to the EU would all be spent on the health service – a promise already retracted within hours of a Brexit victory. So it was not a promise, but a lie.

The UK is in for a very uncomfortable ride in the years to come and I expect a lot of political graffiti/street art to emerge…which at this moment is the only positive thing I can cling on to.

Post Brexit blues

 

Hollow victory

and simmering resentment;

country divided.

 

by Scooj

 

 

Really sorry to draw this out. The wounds here are still sore. In my life I have never known such a divided nation before and unusually, the injured parties are younger people and graduates. What a bad idea the referendum was. The phrase ‘be careful what you wish for’ has never been so apt.

297. Stokes Croft corner wall (3)

This is another one of 3Dom’s favourite walls. For about a year the space has been occupied by his slightly odd skull in a birdcage piece. Its replacement is something altogether different and in my view odd or unsettling.

3Dom, Stokes Croft, Bristol, June 2016
3Dom, Stokes Croft, Bristol, June 2016

This is a piece full of symbolism that I can’t for the life of me unravel. The piece presents us with a foetus that has the Earth for a head. The dark red surround is, I guess, representative of the womb, which appears to be a landfill site or some other wasteland. All most peculiar.

3Dom, Stokes Croft, Bristol, June 2016
3Dom, Stokes Croft, Bristol, June 2016

I think it would be good top try and collar him sometime and ask him about some of his pieces, as they are wild, hugely creative and visually provocative.

296. All Saints’ Street

One of the great achievements of the See No Evil street art events in 2011 and 2012 has been the way in which the large pieces have now become local landmarks in the Nelson Street area. In a city where the turnover of street art tends to be incredibly high, it is great to have these untouched iconic pieces that form the backbone of some of the tourist street art tours. I have said it before though, the best thing about the scene here in Bristol is the huge spectrum of work from DBK tagging through to pieces by the world class Pixel Pancho.

Pixel Pancho, All Saints' Street, Bristol, June 2016
Pixel Pancho, All Saints’ Street, Bristol, June 2016

This lovely piece by Pixel Pancho is instantly recognisable as one of his by the use of mechanical elements blended with the biological, to give a robotic appearance. Having one of his works here in Bristol, made it all the better when I recently saw him at work in New York.

Pixel Pancho, All Saints' Street, Bristol, June 2016
Pixel Pancho, All Saints’ Street, Bristol, June 2016

I have yet to see a decent photograph of this piece. It is high on a wall on a shaded side of the street and is difficult to frame without getting light pollution from the surrounding skyline. The colours always look washed out, unless they have been digitally enhanced.

This is a real cultural asset for Bristol.